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Thread: type of tari

  
  1. #1
    kickcut44
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    type of tari

    ano usual gamit niyo na metal for your knife?

  2. #2
    Member russell's Avatar
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    high speed po

  3. #3
    Member jolan's Avatar
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    Tari, metal

    Titanium.. di ako sure kung pure titanium eto galing kay ampy ng mandaluyong

  4. #4
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    titanium

    early 90s bumili rin ako kay ampy ng titanium, 1300 per piece. matibay, magaang, pero mapurol. hindi kasing talas ng mga carbon steel. siguro hindi lang ako hiyang titanium.

  5. #5
    Member mariobros's Avatar
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    Talking


  6. #6
    Senior Member earan's Avatar
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    ako PMS second to superhard metals...

  7. #7
    Member mariobros's Avatar
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    aling cobalt ang gamit ninyo? Momax?

  8. #8
    Senior Member nerosky's Avatar
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    Sie earan

    ano pong metal ung PMS san po nakakabili nyan.

  9. #9
    Member augustmoonknife's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    Japanese Sword Making


    Japanese swords played an extraordinary role in Japanese history, beginning with the mythology of it's creation. The Sun Goddess, Amaterasu Omikami is said to have given her grandson, Ninigi-no Mikoto, a sword when he was sent down to reign on earth.

    Swords were thought to have miraculous powers and lives of their own. As a result a strict code of etiquette was developed for handling and maintaining swords. Swords were thought to have miraculous powers and lives of their own. Soldiers defeated in battle prayed at the shrines of the war-god Hachiman, asking why their swords had lost their spirit. Many stories have come down about the spiritual powers of notable blades as well as the keen sharpness of the blade.

    One of these stories tells about two famous swordsmiths, named Muramasa and Masume, who were considered almost equal in skill. They decided to have a contest to see who could make a better sword. As a test for the sword, Muramasa held his sword upright in a swift running stream. Every dead leaf that drifted against the edge of the sword was cut neatly in two. When Masume put his sword to the same test, the floating leaves avoided its edge passing unhurt on either side; Masume's blade therefore was declared superior to its rival as it clearly possessed a spiritual and/or mystical power.

    Because of the importance of the sword and the mystical significance attached to them, the sword makers were an honored class, and they approached their task with great solemnity. It was believed that only those with the purest of hearts and the highest moral standards, could become a master swordsmith. Thus, those who mastered the art were honored and highly respected by their feudal lords.
    The Making of the Blade
    Before forging the blades, the swordsmiths underwent fasting and ritual purification. They then worked at their anvils in white clothes, like the robes of the priests. There efforts were well rewarded; as early as the 13th Century, Japanese swords were recognized as far superior than any made elsewhere in the world. Not until the development of modern scientific metallurgy in the 19th century, could steel be made that would challenge the quality of that made by these Japanese swordsmith 600 years earlier.

    To produce their superlative blades, Japanese artisans had to overcome a problem that had baffled all armorers throughout the world since the earliest time of recorded history. Sword makers could make steel very hard so that it would hold a sharp edge. However, making steel very hard also made it very brittle and often in battle a sword would be broken if hit just right against another sword or object. The sword makers knew how to make soft steel that would be less brittle and would not break in battle. However soft steel would not hold a sharp edge and it would quickly dull in battle and would not be able to cut through armor or hack of limbs and heads as a good sword was expected to do.

    One way the Japanese sword makers solved the problem was to hammer together layers of steel of varying hardness welding them into a metal sandwich. This sandwich of metal layers was then reheated, folded back on itself and hammered out thin again. After this had been repeated about a dozen times, the steel consisted of thousands of paper-thin laminations of hard and soft metal. When it was ground to a sharp edge the hard metal stood out and resisted dulling, while the soft steel kept the sword from breaking.

    But to produce their best blades, the swords that are sought after by collectors today, the Japanese sword makers used a much more intricate process. For the core, or interior, of the blade, they used a comparatively soft, laminated metal that would resist breaking. The blade's exterior and edge, however, were made of different grades of hard steel welded together in a sandwich that was folded and hammered out as many as 20 times or more, giving it more than a million laminations! This outer "skin" of steel could be made even harder by first heating the sword and then suddenly cooling it. As a final step the master swordsmith would cover the roughly finished blade with a thick layer of adhesive material, mostly clay, leaving only the edge exposed, and heat the blade until the glowing metal reached the right shade of color. The best way to judge this crucially delicate stage was to work in a darkened room. Then with prayer, the sword maker would plunge the heated blade into water. The exposed edge cooled instantly while the rest of the blade, protected by the clay, cooled slowly and remained comparatively soft. The final result was a sword blade of soft non-brittle metal enclosed in a thin layer of hard steel. About one fifth of an inch of its edge was made of metal so hard that it held a razor sharpness during repeated use in battle.

    The best known sword maker in Japan today is the Japan Sword Company in Tokyo. The ancient techniques and Shinto rituals of the early masters have been preserved by the swordsmiths of this company and visitors are welcomed, by appointment, to view the steps of forging a new sword

  10. #10
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    wow bagong design yan augustmoon,hirap bunotin niyan at wak wak pa naka tama. siguro kuha yan design sa mga book ng samurai sword.or japanese tanto...

  11. #11
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    ano ba ang thickness ng metal para gawin ng long knife?

  12. #12
    Senior Member stinger's Avatar
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    I use....

    24 pieces Cobalt and 5 pieces Japanese 50 Caliber.. (the 5 J50C are at the bottom portion of the picture).


  13. #13
    Member mariobros's Avatar
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    augustmoon

    di ba ats 34 ang bakal gamit sa samurai swords? Can we do the same process sa mga tari natin? It would be great.

  14. #14
    Senior Member hampaslupa's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    parang kris yang tari mo august..

  15. #15
    Senior Member bantam's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    augustmoon,

    ganda naman ng design ng tari. San ba mas maganda gamitin yang ganyang tari, sa makisi ba o yung paisa-isang palo gaya ng mga salto?

  16. #16
    Senior Member gemini1's Avatar
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    Talking Re: type of tari

    Kala ko pa naman kay AugustMoon Japanese sword ang gagamitin sa manokis....

  17. #17
    Senior Member hampaslupa's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    puwede ba yan sa sabungan yang tari mong parang kris ng muslim ang design august?

  18. #18
    Member elmosfire's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    may nakasubok na ba sa inyo ng design na ganyan? any inputs?

  19. #19
    jojo argamosa
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    Re: type of tari

    hinde ba naglo-lock yan sa katawan ng manok??delikado kc pag naglock disgrasya ang manok mo dun

  20. #20
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    Re: type of tari

    Mga kasabong mahilig sa TARI

    Patulong naman kung maka post kayo ng picture or video sa correct
    allignment ng TARI kasi gusto kulang na hindi madaya sa
    sabungan at para madagdagan ang aking kaalaman sa sport na
    ito.

    Salamat sa inyo.
    More winnings!

  21. #21
    LaDy_J
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    Re: type of tari

    Quote Originally Posted by kickcut44
    ano usual gamit niyo na metal for your knife?
    ULTRA IS MY TESTED METAL

    IMPROVED PAK-PAK LANGAW ANG DESIGN KO


    WITHIN STRICT REGULATION WEIGHT AND LENGTH

    I MAKE MY OWN 'TARI'/KNIFE...

    I NEED TO BE SURE OF MY OWN KNIFES



    P.S.
    I DON'T THINK THE 'KRIS' JAGGED DESIGN I SAW UP THERE IN THIS THREAD IS REALIBLE AND MAYBE EVEN CAUSE UNNECESSARY INJURY TO YOUR OWN BIRDS.
    IMAGINE THE CUTTING ACTION OF THE BIRDS LEG AND ON ITS IMPACT TO FLESH AND BONES AND YOU'LL KNOW WHAT I MEAN. NOT TO MENTION AERODYNAMICS WHICH ONLY PLAYS A MINOR PART ANYWAY.
    Last edited by LaDy_J; February 25th, 2007 at 08:08 AM.

  22. #22
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    Re: type of tari

    designed by japanese cocker

    <center><img src="http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i109/phil_jap/DSCF0033.jpg"></center>

  23. #23
    Senior Member hotspur's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    sugbo,thank you for your email,..also for being a gentleman.

  24. #24
    Senior Member devonloch's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    Nais ko lang po sanang magtanong tungkol sa materyal na gnagamit sa pag gawa ng tari...May nakita ksi akong ECLIPSE/ERWIN COBALT HSS ALL HARD na hacksaw...ano kaya ang tamang sukat para gawing tari(ex:300mm/12"...150mm/6")at anong TPI(teeth Per Inch)ang dapat na gamitin?Any INFO pls....Salamat ...

  25. #25
    Senior Member mode0's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    Quote Originally Posted by devonloch
    Nais ko lang po sanang magtanong tungkol sa materyal na gnagamit sa pag gawa ng tari...May nakita ksi akong ECLIPSE/ERWIN COBALT HSS ALL HARD na hacksaw...ano kaya ang tamang sukat para gawing tari(ex:300mm/12"...150mm/6")at anong TPI(teeth Per Inch)ang dapat na gamitin?Any INFO pls....Salamat ...
    basta all-hard ok gawin tari at yung medyo manipis na para hinde na mahirap mag-stock removal. more teeth ay para sa bakal less teeth para sa kahoy o malalambot na bagay.

  26. #26
    Senior Member devonloch's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    Salamat 'Igang MODEO sa info...How about the thickness and width?May tamang sukat ba yan?

  27. #27
    Senior Member mode0's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    kung makakakuha ka ng mga 1/16(.0625") mas mainam para hinde mahirapan ang gagawa. ang width naman ay hinde problema pero mas maganda yung 12" dahil mas-marami ang magagawang tari.

  28. #28
    Member macke_1's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    maganda po siguro yung bakal na galing sa bulalakaw yung ginawang espada ni panday. hehehe walang katalo talo manok nyo.

  29. #29
    Senior Member mode0's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    Quote Originally Posted by macke_1
    maganda po siguro yung bakal na galing sa bulalakaw yung ginawang espada ni panday. hehehe walang katalo talo manok nyo.
    gamitin mo na lang si hugis para talagang walang talo. baka naparami ni Lito Pimentel.

  30. #30
    Member jemerial's Avatar
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    Re: type of tari

    Quote Originally Posted by kickcut44
    ano usual gamit niyo na metal for your knife?
    >> tested na gamit namin ay 10% cobalt. kung gusto mo order ka sa tito ko sa bulacan tapos ipapadala ko sa kanya galing pa kasi dito sa america. cell# 09274993226 puwede mo na rin pagawa sa amin ang tari. price ng cobalt $55.00 makagawa ka ng one dosen na tari.

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