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Thread: buttermilk

  
  1. #1
    tsampoy
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    buttermilk

    in the evening give 1 to 2 drops of vinegar into 1 liter of fresh cow`s milk.let it stand overnight and in room temperature.add a small yogurt and a bottle of yakult.stir briskly and beat until the solution is like melted vanilla ice cream in consistency.this will last for a week if refrigerated.just get the amount you need during feeding.this homemade buttermilk is full of digestive bacteria and really good for our fowl.hahahahahahaha!:lol: :lol:

  2. #2
    Senior Member pogipoint's Avatar
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    buttermilk

    tsamp.

    that is perfect for bacteria to grow. food, Acidity,time,temperature,oxygen, and moisture.

    What kind of bacteria will it produce? or what kind of digestive bacteria will it produce?

    At what temperature and how long do you store the buttermilk?

    just asking

  3. #3
    Senior Member banderado84's Avatar
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    ...

    kakaingit manok mo tsamp heheh...FRESH CARABAO MILK....ulam ko na yan SARRRRAPPP pay may tuyo na may kaliskis.:blush:

  4. #4
    Eboy Martin
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    Yakult na lang kaya!!!!

  5. #5
    alex_g
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    adding vinegar to milk will kill your bacterial culture outright. Milk should be heated first to sterilize it, cool them down to room temperature and then add your culture (lactobacillus acidophilus, L.bulgaricus, L. casei,bifidum longum etc.)

    The reason for sterilization is to kill the harmful bacteria that may grow along your culture that may cause the good and bad bacteria to cancell out each other known as CE or competetive exclusion. The bacteria that will grow depends on what the culture is.

    After adding your culture, don't forget to incubate your preparation around 42 to 44 degrees celcius for eight to ten hours for the bacterial culture to multiply. Put these in the sterilized container and refrigerate (do not freeze) for future use.

    Bacterial growth is self- limiting as the lactic acid produce in the process will come to the point that it will kill the culture themselves, adding the fact that after the entire lactose is consumed, your culture will have nothing to feed on and eventually will stop multiplying.

    Cultured milk and milk products are gut microflora friendly. At the same time they produce hydrogen peroxide that is antiseptic and the lactic acid kills the pathohenic organisms in the intestinal tract. Regular use of the product will serve as a buffering layer in the intestinal tract that makes it thicker making the penetration of the pathogens thru the intestine difficult.

    Some of the diseases prevented by these are enteritis, cholera,E. Coli and coccidiosis and many more.

  6. #6
    tsampoy
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    many thanks for the added infos.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Pinolim's Avatar
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    Pre Alex, thank you for the info. I was thinking aloud and analyzing your posting which is also correct yet I feel there seems to be something missing.
    Pre Tsampoy, I suppose was talking about fresh milk and I suppose too he meant freshly opened(not previously opened) fresh milk.
    All fresh milk sold in the market have been pasteurized under controlled environment so I presume them to be sterile after the pasteurization process so there is no need to boil them to sterilize them again, boiling the milk will alter its freshness nad composition anyway.
    For sure immediately after the container of fresh milk is opened, there will be contamination by the naturally occuring organisms, but the the addition of vinegar into the milk makes the milk a bit acidic which will inihibit the growth and colonization of organisms which could not survive the acidic medium at the same time promoting the growth and survival of bacteria which flourish in the acidic medium(Like the Lactobacillus acidophilus, as the name implies, philo(loves) acid, lactobacillus(Lacto-milk, bacillus- type of bacteria in the milk).
    I guess, immediate refrigeration is necessary without your suggestion of incubation as Lactobacillus( they are not thermophilic) will grow even in refrigeration as long as it is not frozen . (The buttermilk in the supermarkets are refrigerated.
    My opinion only.

  8. #8
    alex_g
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    refrigeration will inactivate these bacteria and put them in a dormant state. In this state they will stop multiplying and although alive slows down in hibernation. When incubated or put in a warm environment they will become active and will start multiplying again. Lactobacilli group of bacteria are thermopilic. They need a warm environment to become active and multiply.

  9. #9
    Senior Member pogipoint's Avatar
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    alex

    Your explanation is very well said...very clear and precise.

    when food is involved, every thing must be measurable, like time, temperature and ph

    thanks for the info

  10. #10
    Senior Member pogipoint's Avatar
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    temperature danger zone is 4.4 to 60 Celsius. Potentially hazardous food like milk with a ph of 4.6 - 7 should not remain in the temperature danger zone for more than 4 hours.

    Always check the temperature of your refrigerator.

  11. #11
    sweaterstag
    Guest
    This is a very good subject and thank you for all of you giving out the info.

    And now I have 1 question to ask, I have perchase what they call Appetite express, can I just ask this product to the milk or do I still have to put some vinegar to the milk?

    Prodcut Label

    Description:
    Appetite Express contains a source of live, naturally occurring microorganisms and vitamins for livestock.

    Guaranteed Analysis Per Pound:

    Total microbial activity
    625 billion colony‑forming units

    Streptococcus faecium
    M‑74

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae


    Lactobacillus acidophilus


    thank yall

  12. #12
    dimbo
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    Can i use those probiotics instead of this concoction? It's readily available in poultry stores at a reasonable price. Thanks....

  13. #13
    Member Carmen Hayes's Avatar
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    Why not just use powered buttermilk? They do sell this at any grocery store.

  14. #14
    Member myf2223's Avatar
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    :rbounce: "im learning more,tnx"

  15. #15
    Senior Member unico's Avatar
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    As simple as...

    Get up to a gallon of milk down to room temp., add a pint of yougurt, cover container with wet cloth - the culture grows better in anaerobic conditions (no oxygen). Let stand overnight in room temp. Soon as it curdles put in the fridge.

    I put a glassful in a blender with any fruit in season with ice...rap-sa and refreshing, your fowl will like it too!!!

    By the way, room temp is something like 78-80 deg F. - can't say room temp in Ontario winter is that warm!

  16. #16
    Senior Member reongmanchi63's Avatar
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  17. #17
    Member raul1's Avatar
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    Re: buttermilk

    Quote Originally Posted by alex_g
    adding vinegar to milk will kill your bacterial culture outright. Milk should be heated first to sterilize it, cool them down to room temperature and then add your culture (lactobacillus acidophilus, L.bulgaricus, L. casei,bifidum longum etc.)

    The reason for sterilization is to kill the harmful bacteria that may grow along your culture that may cause the good and bad bacteria to cancell out each other known as CE or competetive exclusion. The bacteria that will grow depends on what the culture is.

    After adding your culture, don't forget to incubate your preparation around 42 to 44 degrees celcius for eight to ten hours for the bacterial culture to multiply. Put these in the sterilized container and refrigerate (do not freeze) for future use.

    Bacterial growth is self- limiting as the lactic acid produce in the process will come to the point that it will kill the culture themselves, adding the fact that after the entire lactose is consumed, your culture will have nothing to feed on and eventually will stop multiplying.

    Cultured milk and milk products are gut microflora friendly. At the same time they produce hydrogen peroxide that is antiseptic and the lactic acid kills the pathohenic organisms in the intestinal tract. Regular use of the product will serve as a buffering layer in the intestinal tract that makes it thicker making the penetration of the pathogens thru the intestine difficult.

    Some of the diseases prevented by these are enteritis, cholera,E. Coli and coccidiosis and many more.
    Another very informative info..

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