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Thread: Albany

  1. #1
    Member pogibots's Avatar
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    Albany

    Anyone who can share information about albany bloodline?

  2. #2
    tobruk
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    Smile Re: Albany

    Sir pogibots,

    Albany's are mostly yellow legged with pea combs, this bloodline crosses well with any light strain. They are also deadly cutters with power and smash og a Hatch fowl.

    keep on cocking.......

  3. #3
    FIREBOLT45
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    Re: Albany

    if you guys are looking for world class ALBANY....pm me and I will give you this guys email add, he got them straight from Glen Justiss....

  4. #4
    Member sugbo_slashers's Avatar
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    Re: Albany

    long before the advent of the different albany families, the first Albanies were called the STRAIGHT ALBANY. at that time, it was a blend of arguably the 3 gamest bloodlines (HATCH, WHITE HACKLE, MAHOGANY). if my notes are correct, the composition of the STRAIGHT ALBANY is:

    1/2 MAHOGANY, 1/4 RH, 1/8 HATCH, 1/16 WHITE HACKLE, 1/16 HENNY

    they werent considered top notch fowls at that time, but they also werent noted to run or sulk when the going gets tough.

    the Johnny Moore Albany is a blend of STRAIGHT ALBANY and REGULARY GREY with the GREY BLOOD bred out. it is said that they will throw an occasional blue or green legged in 1 out of 50

    albanies are large powerful red fowls with broad saddles. they are mostly yellow legged.

    our JM Albanies are rose combed and prefer slugging it out in the ground. they did well crossed to DF Sweaters and Doc Robinsons Hatch. our crosses with RH tamed their temper only just a bit. their winning fights ended with billholding.

    when we sparred the broodcocks, the Albany are always tagged by the RH and Sweater in the air. bagsak sila sa lupa..hehehe. pero kapag nakahawak, diretso kami sunggab para awatin. ganyan ka tindi ang palo ng Albany.

    the Amphil bros showed some Albanies in the WSC, you'll get an idea on how they fight watching the fights.

    ive noticed that broad saddled fowls (whatever the bloodline) are stronger. this is just my opinion.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Dynamite asil's Avatar
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    Re: Albany

    Nice info bro. I use Albany to blend with asil

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    Member barakitok's Avatar
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  7. #7
    Member mt.samat's Avatar
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    Re: Albany

    THE ALBANYS By: E.T.Piper (August 1965)

    Every time we read in a game journal or hear someone arguing about how a famous strain was bred, it used to make us smile. Now, after a lot of developing into the history of present day families of fowl, it makes us laugh right out loud. If any man ever hit the nail on the head, it was Henry Ford when he said, much to the disgust of our scholarly element, "History is the bunk!" Much of the history taught in our schools is just that, or at its best inaccurate reporting of past events, and all game fowl history is absolutely bunk. Ninety-five percent of us gamefowl breeders don't know how our own fowl are bred further than two or three generations back. A whole hell of a lot of us are not positive how last season's chicks were bred, and them right on our own yard at that. Sounds silly, but it's true. Let's take the Allen Roundheads as a well-known example. We know they were good. I can show you a man who claims to have letters from Allen in which he claims his strain was kept good by careful inbreeding.

  8. #8
    Member mt.samat's Avatar
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    Re: Albany

    I can show you another who says he has letters to prove the best cocks Allen ever showed were crosses of Green's Japs; and still another who contends the best Allen ever fought, and this over a period of years, were not bred by Allen at all, but sent him each year by a New England saloon keeper. And, all three of these men claim to have positive proof of their contentions. What's the difference how they are or aren't bred, or who bred them? If they are good today, that's what you want and need. If they aren't good, a silly pedigree of long, pure breeding isn't going to improve them a particle. Recently, we talked to a well-known cocker and a competent man. We asked him about some fowl he had tried out for three years. He said, "I had to get rid of every drop of the blood. All the damned things would do is stand there like fence posts and take whatever the other cock handed them." Now, we happen to know a considerable amount of those fowl and their owner. He can write out the pedigree of any chicken on his yard and trace it right back to 1865 or '70; not another drop of outside blood in all those years.

  9. #9
    Member mt.samat's Avatar
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    Re: Albany

    are positively jokes. Keeping pedigrees of animals and birds was begun simply becauseThey are famous today among paper fighters. Yet, compared with today's best cocks, they it furnished (for future reference) a record in writing of how outstanding individuals were bred, who their fathers, mothers, grandfathers, grandmothers, and the proper place for their pedigrees is in the trash can. In two different issues of the Warrior some time last summer, we gave you the history of the Albany fowl; one of today's winning strains of fowl. We had been much interested in these fowl for the past 9 or 10 years, or longer, ever since we saw some of them back in 1930 or '31. Since then, at every opportunity, we have tried to get a line on how they were originated and bred, up to today. Finally, we thought we had it right and gave in to you. On a recent trip to Troy, we found out it was only approximately correct, so, here it is again. If you are tired of reading our stuff on these fowl, we don't' blame you a bit, and promise this is our last word on the Albanys. Back years ago or more, Mr. hatch of Long Island, N.Y., fought a main in Eastern New York.

  10. #10
    Member mt.samat's Avatar
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    Re: Albany

    When we arrived home, he found someone had stolen three cocks from his shipping coops, the ones he had taken along for the main. Two of them were yellow legged and one a green leg. While the men who have us our information said they would take their oaths they didn't know who stole these cocks, they did know who eventually got them. The two yellow legs were bred and produced nothing worthwhile. "Army" Fox of Utica, N.Y. got the green leg. He was a large, straight comb, broad backed, dark red, with green legs. Army later talked with Mr. Hatch about having the cock, and he told him what he was, that all of that family were straight combs, etc. Army said he would send and get him. His friend told him the cock had died, and that he wasn't his type of chicken anyway. However, he had raised two or three stags form him , and a hen that was in breeding, Pogmore Whitehackle and Henny, and offered to send Army one of the stags. When he arrived, he was a beautiful, long feathered, large stag, black and red in color. He was bred to the Slade Roundhead hens and a dozen or so stags were produced. About half of them looked like Hennies, and while game, better than the Hennies, and that's about all that could be said of them. About this time and for some years previous, Tom Foley of Troy, N.Y., had a strain of extras good ginger colored fowl, and Army Fox sent to him and asked for a good cock to breed. Just about this time, and Albany crowd one of his Gingers, a spangle (and the only one out of 50 or so to come that color), to fight in the main. He was a big cock and didn't fall in (but in a hack after the main won a very classy battle), and was sent on to Army Fox for a brood cock.

  11. #11
    Member mt.samat's Avatar
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    Re: Albany

    Army bred him to the pullets, or perhaps hens by then, that were sisters to the Henny stags that were out of the Hatch Pogmore Henny cock and Slade hens. This mating, for some unknown reason, produced all very small fowl, 4.0, 4.04, 4.06, etc., too small for practical purposes although they were exceptional fighters and very game. Practically all of them were given away. Shortly after this, Army met a friend of his in Albany, whom we must refer to as Mr. X. He had always had gamefowl, but a few years before had gotten into politics. At that time, he gave up the fowl. Army suggested he get back in the game again, that new blood was needed among the big shots, and especially new blood with a bankroll. He laughed and said perhaps he would, but where would he get good fowl?


    my albany st com wl
    http://sabong.net.ph/gallery/showpho...user/3627/sl/s

  12. #12
    Member brownfox's Avatar
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    Re: Albany

    Nice info. Thanks!

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