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Thread: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

  
  1. #31
    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Draven51501
    sir ed, i can't find the Supermax website.. here's my e-mail address draven51501@yahoo.com thank you!
    EEA Indians might have quoted it wrong. The Supermax website do not mention Pro Bio but it ahs a process of making your own home made probiotics. It's really very simple and cheap but as effective as the store bought products. http://supermaxpointingsystem.wordpress.com will give you detailed info on how to make your own probiotics. Very effective for chickens, dogs and pigs. Also try visiting: http://farmerlarry.wordpress.com

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    Senior Member hanes's Avatar
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    Red face Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    April 25th, 2008, 11:00 AM #12 bebs espinosa vbmenu_register("postmenu_1700338", true);
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SuperMax
    thanks Bebs, You practically are doing what old Mongols did when they prepare yogurt. You can also put it inside a styrofoam chest together with about 1 liter of warm water to raise the temperature to about 55 degrees celsius. This is the growing temperature of lactobacilli. For the readers, You may also read Agriculture Mag March 2008 issue page 64 on how to make yogurt at home using a thick wad of newspaper as heat retainer. It's illustrated for easy reading!



    supermax,

    im here right now in NJ how i wish we could have a chat about all this in person, very interesting topic .......... i've been a subcriber of different agricultural magazine which i use to bring when i was employed as a mariner before, lots of tips and very informative....thanks for the tip, i will do that!!!.....

    i already send a copy of your probiotics on how to make it back home, this is a big help and really i appreciate what your are sharing to us..........mabuhay ka!
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    Sir Bebs Espinosa, parehas pala tayong taga New Jersey ako dito sa Jersey City, kabayan saan ka dito, at sana makapagchicken talk tayo paminsan minsan kasi alam ko marami at bihasa na kayo sa pag-aalaga ng manok sasabungin at para makapulot din ng knowledge at dagdag sa mga tropang sabungero.

  3. #33
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    Wink Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperMax
    EEA Indians might have quoted it wrong. The Supermax website do not mention Pro Bio but it ahs a process of making your own home made probiotics. It's really very simple and cheap but as effective as the store bought products. http://supermaxpointingsystem.wordpress.com will give you detailed info on how to make your own probiotics. Very effective for chickens, dogs and pigs. Also try visiting: http://farmerlarry.wordpress.com
    ah.. thank you, sir.. will be reading it..

  4. #34
    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Draven51501
    sir ed, i can't find the Supermax website.. here's my e-mail address draven51501@yahoo.com thank you!
    Pro bio is not found in the Supermax Website but you can find articles on how to make your own probiotics for chickens there. Also try http://farmerlarry.wordpress.com
    It has articles on alternatiev methods of raising chickens and how to make your own probiotics whch is as effective as store bought products. The method used is that of Dr. Hiruo Higa who developed the technology in the 1930s
    Last edited by SuperMax; April 27th, 2008 at 09:39 PM.

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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperMax
    I am just curious. How many of us use yakult, Lactobacillus Plantarum and other probiotics to raise our fighting cocks?

    SIR THANKS FOR SHARING THIS VERY HELPFUL TIPS. NOT ONLY CAN I USE THIS IN MY CHICKENS BUT ALSO IN OTHER LIVESOCKS AND FARM CROPS. MABUHAY KA!!!!

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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Try LACTO PAFI (Probiotic) manufactured in Cebu . Bottled in 500ml & 1 liter.

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    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianK
    SIR THANKS FOR SHARING THIS VERY HELPFUL TIPS. NOT ONLY CAN I USE THIS IN MY CHICKENS BUT ALSO IN OTHER LIVESOCKS AND FARM CROPS. MABUHAY KA!!!!
    Definitely! I had been using the system for the last 4 years. I now seldom use antibiotics (only when extremely necessary) and I feed lesser amounts to my chickens because of efficient digestion. My Belgian M's are not as smelly as other dogs despite being caged. Probiotics has done a lot for me. thank Dr. Higa!

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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    I've been looking for PowerPak powder to try introducing this Probiotics in our farm but its not available in our local poultry suppliers, even in cagayan de oro its not available too...
    What other Probiotics are available in the market, especially the Water Soluble ones for easy application, maybe they're available in our neighborhood i just dont know their brand names...
    If nothing can be conveniently found in our place, i'm willing to try making my own thru SuperMax way...thanks man for giving me this option...

    Btw, i bought some Probiotic Capsules for human, do you think i can use the powder inside and mix it with their water or feed? It says it contains about 110 million microbes/caps...ty

  9. #39
    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Z
    I've been looking for PowerPak powder to try introducing this Probiotics in our farm but its not available in our local poultry suppliers, even in cagayan de oro its not available too...

    What other Probiotics are available in the market, especially the Water Soluble ones for easy application, maybe they're available in our neighborhood i just dont know their brand names...
    If nothing can be conveniently found in our place, i'm willing to try making my own thru SuperMax way...thanks man for giving me this option...

    Btw, i bought some Probiotic Capsules for human, do you think i can use the powder inside and mix it with their water or feed? It says it contains about 110 million microbes/caps...ty
    It's not really my way but an adaptation or modification of the Japanese scientist's method. I found it effective and had used it since. I encourage readers to do the same. Not only will you get your fowls, dogs and pigs healtheir, you will also lessen your expenses in meds and feeds! It's also easy to make! Believe me.

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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    sir supermax, when i was racing pigeons, i used avian probiotics. i don't have much knowledge about probiotics. do you think theres no difference between human and avian probiotics if used to chickens. thanks again sir......

  11. #41
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by danbrilll
    sir supermax, when i was racing pigeons, i used avian probiotics. i don't have much knowledge about probiotics. do you think theres no difference between human and avian probiotics if used to chickens. thanks again sir......
    Almost no difference. but with humans, they have to be prepared hygienically. With birds, some compromise can be made. but the cleaner the better. Actually, I had been preparing probiotics and teahing farmers how to do it for the last 4 years or so and no one has yet reported that their animals got sick because of probiotics. The only feedback I received is that Probiotics have really helped. try the formula adopted from Dr. Higa. You can also surf by typing in the Google query bar: Natural Farming and look for Dr. Hiruo Higa

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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    SuperMax

    Thanks for you useful comments
    How is your idea about silage ?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silage
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactic_acid_fermentation

    masao
    Last edited by masao; April 29th, 2008 at 06:08 AM.

  13. #43
    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by masao
    SuperMax

    Thanks for you useful comments
    How is your idea about silage ?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silage
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactic_acid_fermentation

    masao
    If you are in the Philippines, only a few people try ensilage technology. but definitely, ensiling is one way to get nature to work for you. The process of converting forage into better feed with the use of bacteria thru anaerobic decomposition is one technology that our forefathers handed down to us which we should be thankful for.

    I do ensiling on a limited scale using black polyethylene garbage plastic. I feed this to 3 goats I raise. They love the silage and it saves me the expense for concetrates.

    Supermax

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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Gooday cockmate! I just got your procedure in making IMO. I can't wait to use this method on my litttle farm.I also can't wait for the continuation of your pointing method on your blog site.Thank you Sir in advance! More Power and God Bless!

    C.A.T.

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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    SuperMax

    Here is a picture of Lactobacillus casei strain shirota.
    Have you ever seen this through microscope ?
    I have a microscope( x 600) but I have not yet tried it.

    >If you are in the Philippines, only a few people try ensilage technology. but
    >converting forage into better feed with the use of bacteria thru anaerobic
    >decomposition is one technology that our forefathers handed down to us
    >which we should be thankful for.
    So what we are looking for is how to provide Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) to our chicken.
    Direct from Yakult drink?
    Mix Yakult to feed or water ?
    Or through ensilage in varous way ?
    Which is more effective and cheaper method ?
    That is a question !!

    I do agree with your all of comments and respect your konwledge and attitude .
    Nice thread you have started.

    masao
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Senior Member Neil ma's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperMax
    I am just curious. How many of us use yakult, Lactobacillus Plantarum and other probiotics to raise our fighting cocks?
    Good idea

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    Senior Member extremes_20s's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Bai Draven,

    where in cebu can u buy the lactoenzyme forte?
    can u post the packaging of that product here?

    thanks and goodluck on those fights!

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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    thanks again sir supermax, i will follow your advise to find the way how to culture probiotics and proper use for our chickens. its not only minimizes expenses but also the benifits we can get to boost our chickens health and other animals is a big help.

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    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by masao
    SuperMax

    Here is a picture of Lactobacillus casei strain shirota.
    Have you ever seen this through microscope ?
    I have a microscope( x 600) but I have not yet tried it.

    >If you are in the Philippines, only a few people try ensilage technology. but
    >converting forage into better feed with the use of bacteria thru anaerobic
    >decomposition is one technology that our forefathers handed down to us
    >which we should be thankful for.
    So what we are looking for is how to provide Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) to our chicken.
    Direct from Yakult drink?
    Mix Yakult to feed or water ?
    Or through ensilage in varous way ?
    Which is more effective and cheaper method ?
    That is a question !!

    I do agree with your all of comments and respect your konwledge and attitude .
    Nice thread you have started.

    masao
    Nice loking Beneficial Bacteria! surely it does not know haw he had helped make the world a better place!

  20. #50
    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by chickenman
    Try LACTO PAFI (Probiotic) manufactured in Cebu . Bottled in 500ml & 1 liter.
    Yes! Lactopafi is very good. It's made from soybeans! I am still taking it but for my chickens I just make my own probiotics. For those who have not yet tried Lactobacilli plantarum, the effect is like Yakult, bifidus and Yogurt!

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    Senior Member bebs espinosa's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    HERE I CAN SHARE WITH EVERYONE..................HOPE IT HELPS.....



    Yogurt is made by adding Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus into heated milk. After this inoculation the milk is held at 110°F ± 5°F until firm. The milk is coagulated (thickened) by an increase in acidity from lactic acid produced by the bacteria. With its slightly sour taste, creamy texture, and good nutrient content, skim or whole milk yogurt remains a healthy food itself and one that can be used in recipes from appetizers to desserts.

    Yogurt is thought to have originated many centuries ago among the nomadic tribes of Eastern Europe and Western Asia. Milk stored in animal skins would acidify and coagulate. The acid helped preserve the milk from further spoilage and from the growth of pathogens (disease-causing microorganisms).

    Ingredients (to make 4-5 cups of yogurt) :

    1-quart milk (cream, whole, low fat, or skim) — In general the higher the milk fat level in the yogurt the creamier and smother it will taste. Note: If you use home-produced milk it must be pasteurized before preparing yogurt.
    Nonfat dry milk powder — Use 1/3-cup powder when using whole or low fat milk, or use 2/3-cup powder when using skim milk. The higher the milk solids the firmer the yogurt will be. For even more firmness add gelatin (directions below).
    Commercial, unflavored, cultured yogurt — Use ¼-cup. Be sure the product label indicates that it contains a live culture. Also note the content of the culture. L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus are required in yogurt, but some manufacturers may in addition add L. acidophilus and/or B. bifidum. The latter two are used for slight variations in flavor, but more commonly for health reasons attributed to these organisms. All culture variations will make a successful yogurt.
    (Optional) 2 to 4 tablespoons sugar or honey.
    (Optional) For a thick, firm yogurt swell 1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin in a little milk for 5 minutes. Add this to the milk and non-fat dry milk mixture before cooking.
    Tools:

    Double Boiler, preferred or regular saucepan 1-2 quarts in capacity larger than the volume of yogurt you wish to make.
    Cooking or Jelly Thermometer. A thermometer that can clip to the side of the saucepan and remain in the milk works best. Accurate temperatures are critical for successful processing.
    Mixing spoon
    Yogurt containers, e.g. cups with lids or canning jars with lids.
    Incubator: a yogurt-maker, oven, heating pad, or warm spot in your kitchen. To use your oven, place yogurt containers into deep pans of 110°F water. Water should come at least halfway up the containers. Set oven temperature at lowest point to maintain water temperature at 110°F. Monitor temperature throughout incubation making adjustments as necessary.
    Processing:

    1. Pasteurization for any non-commercial milk.
    Heat water in the bottom section of a double boiler and pour milk into the top section. Cover the milk and heat to 165°F while stirring constantly for uniform heating. Cool immediately by setting the top section of the double boiler in ice water or cold running water. Store milk in the refrigerator in clean containers until ready for making yogurt.

    2. Combine ingredients and heat.
    Heating the milk is a necessary step to change the milk proteins so that they set together rather than to form curds and whey. Do not substitute this heating step for pasteurization. Place cold, pasteurized milk in top of a double boiler and stir in nonfat dry milk powder. Adding non-fat dry milk to heated milk will cause some milk proteins to coagulate and form strings. Add sugar or honey if a sweeter, less tart yogurt is desired. Heat milk to 200°F, stirring gently and (a) hold for 10 minutes for thinner yogurt or (b) hold 20 minutes for thicker yogurt. Do not boil. Be careful and stir constantly to avoid scorching if not using a double boiler.

    3. Cool and inoculate.
    Place the top of the double boiler in cold water to cool milk rapidly to 112-115°F. Remove one cup of the warm milk and blend it with the yogurt starter culture. Add this to the rest of the warm milk. The temperature of the mixture should now be 110-112°F.

    4. Incubate.
    Pour immediately into clean, warm container(s); cover and place in prepared incubator. Close the incubator and incubate about 4 - 7 hours at 110°F ± 5°F. Yogurt should set firm when the proper acid level is achieved (pH 4.6). Incubating yogurt for several hours past the time after the yogurt has set will produce more acidity. This will result in a more tart or acidic flavor and eventually cause the whey to separate.

    5. Refrigerate.
    Rapid cooling stops the development of acid. Yogurt will keep for about 10-21 days if held in the refrigerator at 40°F or lower.

    Yogurt Types:

    Set yogurt: A solid set where the yogurt firms in a container and not disturbed.
    Stirred yogurt: Yogurt made in a large container then spooned or otherwise dispensed into secondary serving containers. The consistency of the “set” is broken and the texture is less firm than set yogurt. This is the most popular form of commercial yogurt.
    Drinking yogurt: Stirred yogurt to which additional milk and flavors are mixed in. Add fruit or fruit syrups to taste. Mix in milk to achieve the desired thickness. The shelf life of this product is 4-10 days, since the pH is raised by fresh milk addition. Some whey separation will occur and is natural. Commercial products recommend a thorough shaking before consumption.
    Fruit yogurt: Fruit, fruit syrups, or pie filling can be added to the yogurt. They are placed on top, on bottom, or stirred into the yogurt.
    Yogurt cheese: Line a large strainer or colander with cheesecloth. Place this over a bowl and then pour in the yogurt. Do not use yogurt made with the addition of gelatin. Gelatin will inhibit whey separation. Let it drain overnight covered with plastic wrap. Empty the whey from the bowl. Fill a strong plastic storage bag with some water, seal and place over the cheese to weigh it down. Let the cheese stand another 8 hours after which it is ready to use. The flavor is similar to a sour cream with a texture of a soft cream cheese. A pint of yogurt will yield approximately 1/4 lb. of cheese. The yogurt cheese has a shelf life of approximately 7-14 days when wrapped and placed in the refrigerator and kept at less than 40°F. For uses, recipes, and more information on yogurt cheese see the “Resources”; section below.
    Frozen yogurt: Follow directions given with most home ice cream makers.
    Trouble-shooting:

    If your:

    Milk forms some clumps or strings during the heating step. Some milk proteins may have jelled. Take the solids out with a slotted spoon or in difficult cases after cooking pour the milk mixture through a clean colander or cheesecloth before inoculation.
    Yogurt fails to coagulate (set) properly. Milk proteins will coagulate when the pH has dropped to 4.6. This is done by the culture growing and producing acids.
    Adding culture to very hot milk (+115°F) can kill bacteria–Use a thermometer to carefully control temperature.
    Too hot or too cold of an incubation temperature can slow down culture growth–Use a thermometer to carefully control temperature.
    The starter culture was of poor quality–Use a fresh, recently purchased culture from the grocery store each time you make yogurt.
    Yogurt tastes or smells bad.
    Starter culture is contaminated–Obtain new culture for the next batch.
    Yogurt has over-set or incubated too long–Refrigerate yogurt immediately after a firm coagulum has formed.
    Overheating or boiling of the milk causes an off-flavor–Use a thermometer to carefully control temperature.
    Whey collects on the surface of the yogurt. This is called syneresis. Some syneresis is natural. Excessive separation of whey, however, can be caused by incubating yogurt too long or by agitating the yogurt while it is setting.
    Food safety, spoilage and shelf life

    Yogurt provides two significant barriers to pathogen growth: (a) heat and (b) acidity (low pH). Both are necessary to ensure a safe product. Acidity alone has been questioned by recent outbreaks of food poisoning by E. coli O157:H7 that is acid-tolerant. E. coli O157:H7 is easily destroyed by pasteurization (heating). Therefore, always pasteurize milk or use commercially pasteurized milk to make yogurt.

    Discard batches that fail to set properly, especially those due to culture errors. Yogurt generally has a 10-21 day shelf life when made and stored properly in the refrigerator below 40°F. Molds, yeasts and slow growing bacteria can spoil the yogurt during prolonged storage. Ingredients added to yogurt should be clean and of good quality. Introducing microorganisms from yogurt add-ins can reduce shelf life and result in quicker spoilage–”garbage in, garbage out”. Discard any yogurt samples with visible signs of microbial growth or any odors other than the acidity of fresh yogurt.

    Always use clean and sanitized equipment and containers to ensure a long shelf life for your yogurt. Clean equipment and containers in hot detergent water, then rinse well. Allow to air dry.

    Kitchen Notes

    When making this recipe in our test kitchen we used a saucepan instead of a double boiler. Despite constant stirring we still had some minor scorching. We took care not to stir or scrape the scorched area. During the cooking step milk proteins formed strings that we scooped out with a slotted spoon. We inoculated our entire batch of milk with starter and poured the mixture into separate containers. To some containers we added different amounts of honey or sugar stirring to dissolve the sweetener, while others we left plain. Our yogurt reached pH 4.7 in approx. four hours, pH 4.6 in approx. five hours and pH 4.5 in approx. six hours. The yogurt set was firm after six hours and the taste was mild. The yogurt was immediately refrigerated until the next day. On the following day we processed the yogurt into some of the variations listed above under “Yogurt Types”.

  22. #52
    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by bebs espinosa
    HERE I CAN SHARE WITH EVERYONE..................HOPE IT HELPS.....



    Yogurt is made by adding Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus into heated milk. After this inoculation the milk is held at 110°F ± 5°F until firm. The milk is coagulated (thickened) by an increase in acidity from lactic acid produced by the bacteria. With its slightly sour taste, creamy texture, and good nutrient content, skim or whole milk yogurt remains a healthy food itself and one that can be used in recipes from appetizers to desserts.

    Yogurt is thought to have originated many centuries ago among the nomadic tribes of Eastern Europe and Western Asia. Milk stored in animal skins would acidify and coagulate. The acid helped preserve the milk from further spoilage and from the growth of pathogens (disease-causing microorganisms).

    Ingredients (to make 4-5 cups of yogurt) :

    1-quart milk (cream, whole, low fat, or skim) — In general the higher the milk fat level in the yogurt the creamier and smother it will taste. Note: If you use home-produced milk it must be pasteurized before preparing yogurt.
    Nonfat dry milk powder — Use 1/3-cup powder when using whole or low fat milk, or use 2/3-cup powder when using skim milk. The higher the milk solids the firmer the yogurt will be. For even more firmness add gelatin (directions below).
    Commercial, unflavored, cultured yogurt — Use ¼-cup. Be sure the product label indicates that it contains a live culture. Also note the content of the culture. L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus are required in yogurt, but some manufacturers may in addition add L. acidophilus and/or B. bifidum. The latter two are used for slight variations in flavor, but more commonly for health reasons attributed to these organisms. All culture variations will make a successful yogurt.
    (Optional) 2 to 4 tablespoons sugar or honey.
    (Optional) For a thick, firm yogurt swell 1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin in a little milk for 5 minutes. Add this to the milk and non-fat dry milk mixture before cooking.
    Tools:

    Double Boiler, preferred or regular saucepan 1-2 quarts in capacity larger than the volume of yogurt you wish to make.
    Cooking or Jelly Thermometer. A thermometer that can clip to the side of the saucepan and remain in the milk works best. Accurate temperatures are critical for successful processing.
    Mixing spoon
    Yogurt containers, e.g. cups with lids or canning jars with lids.
    Incubator: a yogurt-maker, oven, heating pad, or warm spot in your kitchen. To use your oven, place yogurt containers into deep pans of 110°F water. Water should come at least halfway up the containers. Set oven temperature at lowest point to maintain water temperature at 110°F. Monitor temperature throughout incubation making adjustments as necessary.
    Processing:

    1. Pasteurization for any non-commercial milk.
    Heat water in the bottom section of a double boiler and pour milk into the top section. Cover the milk and heat to 165°F while stirring constantly for uniform heating. Cool immediately by setting the top section of the double boiler in ice water or cold running water. Store milk in the refrigerator in clean containers until ready for making yogurt.

    2. Combine ingredients and heat.
    Heating the milk is a necessary step to change the milk proteins so that they set together rather than to form curds and whey. Do not substitute this heating step for pasteurization. Place cold, pasteurized milk in top of a double boiler and stir in nonfat dry milk powder. Adding non-fat dry milk to heated milk will cause some milk proteins to coagulate and form strings. Add sugar or honey if a sweeter, less tart yogurt is desired. Heat milk to 200°F, stirring gently and (a) hold for 10 minutes for thinner yogurt or (b) hold 20 minutes for thicker yogurt. Do not boil. Be careful and stir constantly to avoid scorching if not using a double boiler.

    3. Cool and inoculate.
    Place the top of the double boiler in cold water to cool milk rapidly to 112-115°F. Remove one cup of the warm milk and blend it with the yogurt starter culture. Add this to the rest of the warm milk. The temperature of the mixture should now be 110-112°F.

    4. Incubate.
    Pour immediately into clean, warm container(s); cover and place in prepared incubator. Close the incubator and incubate about 4 - 7 hours at 110°F ± 5°F. Yogurt should set firm when the proper acid level is achieved (pH 4.6). Incubating yogurt for several hours past the time after the yogurt has set will produce more acidity. This will result in a more tart or acidic flavor and eventually cause the whey to separate.

    5. Refrigerate.
    Rapid cooling stops the development of acid. Yogurt will keep for about 10-21 days if held in the refrigerator at 40°F or lower.

    Yogurt Types:

    Set yogurt: A solid set where the yogurt firms in a container and not disturbed.
    Stirred yogurt: Yogurt made in a large container then spooned or otherwise dispensed into secondary serving containers. The consistency of the “set” is broken and the texture is less firm than set yogurt. This is the most popular form of commercial yogurt.
    Drinking yogurt: Stirred yogurt to which additional milk and flavors are mixed in. Add fruit or fruit syrups to taste. Mix in milk to achieve the desired thickness. The shelf life of this product is 4-10 days, since the pH is raised by fresh milk addition. Some whey separation will occur and is natural. Commercial products recommend a thorough shaking before consumption.
    Fruit yogurt: Fruit, fruit syrups, or pie filling can be added to the yogurt. They are placed on top, on bottom, or stirred into the yogurt.
    Yogurt cheese: Line a large strainer or colander with cheesecloth. Place this over a bowl and then pour in the yogurt. Do not use yogurt made with the addition of gelatin. Gelatin will inhibit whey separation. Let it drain overnight covered with plastic wrap. Empty the whey from the bowl. Fill a strong plastic storage bag with some water, seal and place over the cheese to weigh it down. Let the cheese stand another 8 hours after which it is ready to use. The flavor is similar to a sour cream with a texture of a soft cream cheese. A pint of yogurt will yield approximately 1/4 lb. of cheese. The yogurt cheese has a shelf life of approximately 7-14 days when wrapped and placed in the refrigerator and kept at less than 40°F. For uses, recipes, and more information on yogurt cheese see the “Resources”; section below.
    Frozen yogurt: Follow directions given with most home ice cream makers.
    Trouble-shooting:

    If your:

    Milk forms some clumps or strings during the heating step. Some milk proteins may have jelled. Take the solids out with a slotted spoon or in difficult cases after cooking pour the milk mixture through a clean colander or cheesecloth before inoculation.
    Yogurt fails to coagulate (set) properly. Milk proteins will coagulate when the pH has dropped to 4.6. This is done by the culture growing and producing acids.
    Adding culture to very hot milk (+115°F) can kill bacteria–Use a thermometer to carefully control temperature.
    Too hot or too cold of an incubation temperature can slow down culture growth–Use a thermometer to carefully control temperature.
    The starter culture was of poor quality–Use a fresh, recently purchased culture from the grocery store each time you make yogurt.
    Yogurt tastes or smells bad.
    Starter culture is contaminated–Obtain new culture for the next batch.
    Yogurt has over-set or incubated too long–Refrigerate yogurt immediately after a firm coagulum has formed.
    Overheating or boiling of the milk causes an off-flavor–Use a thermometer to carefully control temperature.
    Whey collects on the surface of the yogurt. This is called syneresis. Some syneresis is natural. Excessive separation of whey, however, can be caused by incubating yogurt too long or by agitating the yogurt while it is setting.
    Food safety, spoilage and shelf life

    Yogurt provides two significant barriers to pathogen growth: (a) heat and (b) acidity (low pH). Both are necessary to ensure a safe product. Acidity alone has been questioned by recent outbreaks of food poisoning by E. coli O157:H7 that is acid-tolerant. E. coli O157:H7 is easily destroyed by pasteurization (heating). Therefore, always pasteurize milk or use commercially pasteurized milk to make yogurt.

    Discard batches that fail to set properly, especially those due to culture errors. Yogurt generally has a 10-21 day shelf life when made and stored properly in the refrigerator below 40°F. Molds, yeasts and slow growing bacteria can spoil the yogurt during prolonged storage. Ingredients added to yogurt should be clean and of good quality. Introducing microorganisms from yogurt add-ins can reduce shelf life and result in quicker spoilage–”garbage in, garbage out”. Discard any yogurt samples with visible signs of microbial growth or any odors other than the acidity of fresh yogurt.

    Always use clean and sanitized equipment and containers to ensure a long shelf life for your yogurt. Clean equipment and containers in hot detergent water, then rinse well. Allow to air dry.

    Kitchen Notes

    When making this recipe in our test kitchen we used a saucepan instead of a double boiler. Despite constant stirring we still had some minor scorching. We took care not to stir or scrape the scorched area. During the cooking step milk proteins formed strings that we scooped out with a slotted spoon. We inoculated our entire batch of milk with starter and poured the mixture into separate containers. To some containers we added different amounts of honey or sugar stirring to dissolve the sweetener, while others we left plain. Our yogurt reached pH 4.7 in approx. four hours, pH 4.6 in approx. five hours and pH 4.5 in approx. six hours. The yogurt set was firm after six hours and the taste was mild. The yogurt was immediately refrigerated until the next day. On the following day we processed the yogurt into some of the variations listed above under “Yogurt Types”.
    Thanks Bebs!

    This is quite a comprehensive write up which will help a lot of people who wants to make yogurt at home. I am now doing this using the cheapest instant whole milk or skimmed milk here in Iloilo. I use a styrofoam ice box as my incubator, putting warm water about 55 degrees C for heat. My starter is the store bought unflavored yogurt sold at P32.00 per 125 grams.

    To those who have not tried it, yogurt making is very simple and rewarding. The cost per serving (125 grams) of homemade yogurt is just about P5.00 to P7.00 as against P32.00!

    Again Bebs, thanks!

    Supermax

  23. #53
    Member danbrilll's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    good evening kakments. can i suggest someone to post a more simpler procedure to make yogurt. just a plain and simple mix and steps. thanks again....

  24. #54
    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by danbrilll
    good evening kakments. can i suggest someone to post a more simpler procedure to make yogurt. just a plain and simple mix and steps. thanks again....
    Try this blogsite: http://farmerlarry.wordpress.com. the article appeared in the March 2008 issue of Agriculture Magazine (Philippines). It is simplified. the Agriculture Mag issue had pictures.

  25. #55
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by chickenman
    Try LACTO PAFI (Probiotic) manufactured in Cebu . Bottled in 500ml & 1 liter.
    Chickenman,
    Can you post here how much LACTO BAFI cost 500 ml or by liter?
    Availability of these probiotics is a problem in our locality,
    Do you think i can order this product Direct from the Manufacturer?
    Your reply will be a big help, ty

    Big Z

  26. #56
    Member danbrilll's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperMax
    Try this blogsite: http://farmerlarry.wordpress.com. the article appeared in the March 2008 issue of Agriculture Magazine (Philippines). It is simplified. the Agriculture Mag issue had pictures.
    thanks sir supermax.. that was simple and easy guide to produce home made yogurt. the only thing critical is to get the right temperature to grow probiotics in the process...i got no more excuses sir, hehe THANKS

  27. #57
    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Z
    Chickenman,

    Can you post here how much LACTO BAFI cost 500 ml or by liter?
    Availability of these probiotics is a problem in our locality,
    Do you think i can order this product Direct from the Manufacturer?
    Your reply will be a big help, ty


    Big Z
    Big Z,

    LactoPAFI is simply Lactobacilli plantarum and there are many brands like lactoVitale. Just read the label in supermarkets, drugstore and groceris near you and look if the probiotic is Lactobacilli plantarum. In Cebu and Iloilo LactoPAFI sells at P80.00 per 500 ml. and abouty P130 for the 1 liter. It's good and will turn out cheaper than taking yakult and the effect is almost similar.

    But is you can make your own yogurt, it's even cheaper and more delicious!

    Supermax

  28. #58
    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by danbrilll
    thanks sir supermax.. that was simple and easy guide to produce home made yogurt. the only thing critical is to get the right temperature to grow probiotics in the process...i got no more excuses sir, hehe THANKS
    Yes, the critical aspect is the temperature. Believe it or not, I sometimes use a thick was of newspaper as insulator and in 3 hours, I have a perfect yogurt!

  29. #59
    Member C.A.T.'s Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Goodam Sir Supermax, is it ok to use common commercial rice instead of "binlud"? Thanks and Regards.

    C.A.T.

  30. #60
    Senior Member SuperMax's Avatar
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    Re: Do you use Yakult or any Probiotics to Raise Fighting cocks?

    Quote Originally Posted by C.A.T.
    Goodam Sir Supermax, is it ok to use common commercial rice instead of "binlud"? Thanks and Regards.

    C.A.T.
    Yes of course! Binlud or broken rice is cheaper though at about P14.00 per kilo while ordinary rice nowadays cost about P30.00. Anyway, rice, flour or oats are just substrates for the growth of the beneficial bacteria. The resulting fermentation is sourish in odor but when you add equal amount of brown sugar or molasses, it smells sweetish-sour!

    I had been using it for the last 4-5 years for a variety of applications, from chickens and pigs to dogs to plants!

    Supermax

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