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Thread: Everet Claiborns

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    Everet Claiborns

    Has anyone heard of or know someone that has the old Everet claiborns? They were not a toppy, A good friend of mines Grandfather had these back in Tennesse in the 60's. He is trying to locate some. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks

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    Would like here more bout this line, and info guys

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    Re: Everet Claiborns

    Quote Originally Posted by southernX View Post
    Has anyone heard of or know someone that has the old Everet claiborns? They were not a toppy, A good friend of mines Grandfather had these back in Tennesse in the 60's. He is trying to locate some. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
    prob not spelled right i had greicy claiborns an their were tate claiborn never heard of Everet maybey he just put his name on um? mine we're toppys some of the taits wern't toppys an it was in the 60's when i had mine, hope someone has better info than me. they wear good birds.fis

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    EVERETT CLAIBORNE


    EVERETT CLAIBORNE: Originator, James Sanford, 1841. Bloodlines: Early Derby Cock X black Spanish hens X over daughters. Description: Smooth head, light and dark legs, white wing, and tail, some spangle.


    Claiborne history:
    Nearly all authorities agree that the original sire of all Claibornes was a cock of royal breeding, that he came from England and was bright red, showing white in tail and wings an no doubt white legs as he was supposed to be a typical Deal of Derby cock. It has been said also that he was a Sefton cock and came over to this country as a stowaway on a cotton ship, but it must be understood that Judge Clairborne was not the sort to resort to pirate methods to obtain his pit fowl. Judge Claiborne was a true Southerner of the old school and posessed a splendid stable fo horses and in connection with this was one James Sandford, an expugilist, how it appears was a keen judge of game fowl and a handler of pit cocks. Sandford, took a special fancy to this Derby cock and when the time arrived to tie on the heels he was doubly interested. However, the battle was short, the Derby had a **** broken off in his back and Judge Claiborne ordered him taken out to avoid further punishment. By this act you will note that the Judge was a real sportsman and he did not leave a good but helpless cock in the pit to be mauled around pitting after pitting to demonstrate that he had GAME cocks; also to give his pitter an opportunity to demonstrate his skill as a handler. Jim Sandford’s faith in this cock did not weaken on account of losing his battle. Instead he carefully removed the broken **** and asked permission of Judge Claiborne to keep this cock for his own, which was readily granted. By careful nursing he brought this cock back to health and began thinking about a hen to mate with him. Now here is where there is some differences of opinion among noted Claiborne authorities. Some say she was a pure Spanish hen, black in color, while others scout this theory and claim her to be more on the Irish line. Others have argued she was probably in the same blood lines as “Little India,” the famous hen connected with the Warhorse origin. It has come from a reliable source that her brothers were spangles and black-breasted reds and that they were great pit fowl used by a patron of the old Baron Street pit at New Orleans; also that Jim Sandford laughed when asked if this hen was of Spanish breeding. Probably Jim wasn’t broadcasting information in general in her breeding, let it be said, she certainly proved to be a wonderful mother and her gallant offspring in generation after generation in all sections of the continent, hot or cold, in many different hands and length and style of heels, meeting every conceivable kind of foe, barring none, have demonstrated her weight in gold would be a mere piker’s offering for her were she living and in prime today. It was the year of 1841 that Sandford took this pair to John Morrison’s at Mobile, Ala., and it was there he produced the first of this great strain, the Smooth Heads. After fighting the produce from this mating and being convinced that they were great pit fowl he took the original old Derby cock and mated him to five or six pure Baltimore Tassel hens, and from this mating came his Tassel Claibornes. Louis Everette bought a yard of the Tassels of Sandford in 1845 and placed them with Ben Grissette on the Alabama river. They later disagreed and Everette sold his interest to Bob and Felix Tait. Grissette then obtained a Smooth head cock and bred him to the Tassels and called them Grissette Claibornes. Bob Tait was a real breeder and produced some wonderful fowl, but Felix (major) Tait did not keep them up after Bob’s death and infused the Smooth head blood into his Tassels and that is why so many Tait breeders get some Smooth heads occasionally. Everette lived with Dick Harrison at Benton, Ala., who was a trainer of race horses, and Everette was also a horse trainer. Everette secured of Sandford a trio of the Smooth heads, which are today called the Everette Claibornes. He bred these at Harrison’s place. It is said that Everette and Sandford went west to Arkansas and for a time crossed the two Claibornes, Tassels and Smooth heads, and according to Col. Grist who quotes a Mr. Russell, a famous Claiborne breeder, as saying that it was this cross that produced the “Tait Claibornes.” However, Mr. Dyer states that Grissette made this same cross after the split-up between Grissette and Everette; also after Everette had disposed of his Tassels to the Taits that Bob always kept his Tassels pure up to his death, after that Felix Tait secured Smooth head cocks of him (Dyer) and bred them into his Tassels. There were a few yards of the original Tassels and Smooth heads scattered around the Mobile district and it is said that although Jim Sandford made the Claiborne, that he himself, was not a practical breeder and that his sister, Mrs. Sallie Davis, bred his old Smooth heads pure for him, while his brother John did likewise with the Tassels, and under instructions of Everette continued to breed them until each died, Jim Sandford in the 80's ; John in 1898 and Mrs. Davis in 1901 and Louis Everette in 1894. It has been said that no living man can truthfully say that he ever bought a Claiborne from any of the Sandford family. Louis Everette also seemed to be shy on selling stock, although he gave some splendid fowl to Sam and Julius Pickens. When his old friend, John Morrison died, Sandford removed all his fowl to Louis Everette’s yards with Dick Harrison, Everette lived with Dick until his death. Now it can be easily seen that the center fo Claiborne activity was around Mobile and along the Alabama river and all honor is due the great state of Alabama for giving the game fancier of the world one of the most courageous, beautiful, aristocratic and ever-trying pit fowl in all modern times. With his abundant and gorgeous coat of feathers draped over his back like the finest of Val lace, fiery red in color, the purest of white in long tail streamers and his powerful wings carried low, and this, with the blue-black lustre of the wing coverts, gives us the impression of “Old Glory” stirred up with a spoon, stars and all. Like Alabama’s famous “24 Votes for Underwood” at the last Democratic Convention, they will be found hard to count out. The Claiborne hen with her beautiful Wheaton buff color, fan tail, brilliant eye and movement as graceful as a mockingbird, makes her what she is, a queen among game fowl. The Tait hen, although similar in color the Everette, is just a bit more trim and a bit more nervous and somewhat inclined to agitate a quarrel at every opportunity. She resembles a bobbed hair girl with her heavy hood or tassel. Claiborne hens make the best of mothers and often carry their chicks until they are almost as large as herself. Claibornes, if bred right, are very hardy and live to quite an age for fowl. August Grit and Steel, 1923, page 11, showed picture of feet and wings of hen hatched May 1908; died April 1923. Property of B.F. Dyer, Texas. Camillo Kuechier, great breeder of Grissette Claibornes, died March 14th, 1925, in Texas. “Old Mobile,” noted cock of Everette’s, decided 14 mains for him and he was breeding from him at eleven years of age. Up to his tenth battle he had never been scratched with a heel. Sandford named them “Claibornes” in honor of Judge Claiborne, who gave him the old cock. The Judge, it is said, disclaimed any credit in the breeding of them and never owned any of them. B.F. Dyer now living at Weatherford, Texas, assisted and contributed at the burial of Louis Everette in 1894. C.E. Tait, son of Major Felix Tait, died in April 1915, near Camden, Ala. He perpetuated the old Taits for many years in its original purity after his father’s death. Mrs. Lally Tait Bragg, his sister, also helped with the fowl. The Claibornes had swept the country and invaded the Northern pits early is shown in the account of a main in New England between John Marher of (Marr for short) in which Marr used all Claibornes and his opponent Boston Roundheads. The Claibornes are reported to have won every battle in the main. Marr got his start of pure Claibornes from John Stone, four hens and a cock for which he paid Stone $300. Some price those days, 1862. It is said the Claibornes have never been defeated in a full main with a show of 21 cocks. However, the Claibornes are reported to have been defeated in a main in the hands of Jim Sandford himself by Senator Sherrod with his pure uncrossed Eslin Redquills at Memphis, Tenn. Senator Sherrod was assisted by the famous Dick Lee, also Dr. Dick Harris and one of the Eslins, probably Charles. Dr. Harris remained in the South and located in the Claiborne state. Imagine a tournament in which the “score card” gave the line up as follows, each an entry in full: Tait Claibornes, Everette Claibornes, Warhorses, Redquills, Whitehackles, Boston Roundheads, Gee Doms, including entries of the more modern strains. Not every game cock sporting a white feather in his tail is a Claiborne,-not by a jugful. But some of the most successful pitfowl today show their backbone made out of Claiborne material. The Claiborne, like any other strain is no better than their master breeds them. It takes the old Claiborne to put the pep in the Jap and Aseel. Three-fourths and seven-eighths Claiborne blood is the popular grade.
    Last edited by Irishgrey; August 28th, 2013 at 09:05 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ky/hatch View Post
    prob not spelled right i had greicy claiborns an their were tate claiborn never heard of Everet maybey he just put his name on um? mine we're toppys some of the taits wern't toppys an it was in the 60's when i had mine, hope someone has better info than me. they wear good birds.fis
    You weren't far out ky/hatch , it seems grissette and everett were partners for a while,

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    Re: Everet Claiborns

    Quote Originally Posted by Irishgrey View Post
    You weren't far out ky/hatch , it seems grissette and everett were partners for a while,
    thanks for the info Irishgrey,injoyed it brought up alot of old memories been 50 yrs since i had um Dam they could cut but meaner than a barrel of snakes thank for the history lesson.fis Bud

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