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    for those who need it

    *I was setting around looking in my old books, today came across something and i thought some of u beginners might want to read, i hope it helps those who need it. The story is called "My Association with Judge Ernest Lacey" by Harry Charles. This story is taken from GameCock Mag. February 1978. By the late Mr. Harry Charles of Birmingham, Alabama. The true breeding of the Lacey Roundheads R.W. "Hoot" Gibson.

    My recollection of chicken fighting goes back almost 70 years. I was born in 1900 and started earning money when i was six years old by running errands and doing any small odd jobs. By the time i was 8 years old i was trading horses. At the age of 10, I owned a livery stable as the result of successful horse-trading. Judge Ernest Lacey was a probate jude in Jasper, Alabama. In 1910, he rented horses and buggies from me and took a liking to me. he started taking me to all the local chicken fights, and i soon learned to handle, spar and pit the chickens. The yellow-legged Roundheads were originated, to the best of my knowledge, by a man named Burrell Shelton who lived in Mississippi. Just after Shelton dies the owner of the Mountain Eagle newspaper in Jasper, Alabama, bought a setting of eggs from the widow. Judge Lacey bought the chickens hatched from these eggs and continued to breed the Roundheads. "These were known as the Side-Stepping Roundheads". Judge Lacey crossed these Roundhead with the Blue Moon chickens owned by a man named Moon who lived in Kentucky. He also crossed them with the Whitehackle, and these crosses all had white legs. The white-legged Roundheads you buy tody have some Blue Moon and some Whitehackle in them. Judge Lacey gave me the chickens and game me money to bet at the fights. Several of the other fighters also gave me Roundheads. Back then the cockers all fought in the woods. Chickens were carried in tow sacks and the tow sacks were tied upright to trees so the chickens could stand up. You could find the fights by following the sounds of the roosters crowing. Judge Ed Long was President of the first National Bank in Jasper, Alabama and was also a probate Judge. He bred and fought Roundheads as did Judge Lacey. At one time Judge Long fought Judge Lacey a main in the woods on Judge Long's farm near the Warrior River. Judge Long won because he had the best conditioning. Both men were active chicken fighters. Both won a great many fights and both lost a great many too. One night a man named Ware got his chickens lost. I helped him find them in my Model T. He said he would send me some chickens, and he did send me nine. I took a Glover Keep and had my coops against the barn with no scratch pens. I was going to fight these against tough competition. Judge Lacey wouldn't go with me because he didn't think I could win and because he wouldn't bet against me. The Judge loaned me his handler. He was anxious to meet me when I got back. I won 8 out of 9 fights and $2,200. I had one hundred dollars to start with. At that time they made up pots, I doubled every time to cover the pots. In this bunch of cocks I had a great White Dom. This is where I got to love the White Doms. I moved from Jasper to Birmingham about 1920 and them moved to Atlanta, Georgia about 1924. It was there that I met Colonel Eugene Dickey an Attorney and a Mr. Hogg, a beer distributor. They took me to a derby at Albany, Georgia, and what proved to be a fight I shall always remember. The derby was held on a large country plantation and was attended by hundreds of people from all over the United States. The owner of the plantation killed cattle and hogs and fed all the people three meals a day. The meals were free and there was no charge for admission. The End.



    P.S. Maybe some of our new beginners and some semi-experienced cockers will understand where the very light and mottled or raven breast came from the blue blood in the Lacey Roundhead. The Shelton R.H., were originally Allen R.H. with some knobbed comb blue added. -R.W. "Hoot" Gibson.

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    Re: for those who need it

    Enjoyed that Irisheyes, thanks.

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    Re: for those who need it

    this is a very interesting story of a great cocker/breeder. I got one straight bred Lacy roundhead pullet October last year and I'm single mating it with my boston RH.

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    Re: for those who need it

    if u can breed the straight comb lacy to a claret or a good blue. u mite want to try a good whitehackle to.

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    Re: for those who need it

    Was looking up some of papaws stuff thought I would reprint this one for the new guys

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    Re: for those who need it

    Quote Originally Posted by irisheyes485 View Post
    *I was setting around looking in my old books, today came across something and i thought some of u beginners might want to read, i hope it helps those who need it. The story is called "My Association with Judge Ernest Lacey" by Harry Charles. This story is taken from GameCock Mag. February 1978. By the late Mr. Harry Charles of Birmingham, Alabama. The true breeding of the Lacey Roundheads R.W. "Hoot" Gibson.

    My recollection of chicken fighting goes back almost 70 years. I was born in 1900 and started earning money when i was six years old by running errands and doing any small odd jobs. By the time i was 8 years old i was trading horses. At the age of 10, I owned a livery stable as the result of successful horse-trading. Judge Ernest Lacey was a probate jude in Jasper, Alabama. In 1910, he rented horses and buggies from me and took a liking to me. he started taking me to all the local chicken fights, and i soon learned to handle, spar and pit the chickens. The yellow-legged Roundheads were originated, to the best of my knowledge, by a man named Burrell Shelton who lived in Mississippi. Just after Shelton dies the owner of the Mountain Eagle newspaper in Jasper, Alabama, bought a setting of eggs from the widow. Judge Lacey bought the chickens hatched from these eggs and continued to breed the Roundheads. "These were known as the Side-Stepping Roundheads". Judge Lacey crossed these Roundhead with the Blue Moon chickens owned by a man named Moon who lived in Kentucky. He also crossed them with the Whitehackle, and these crosses all had white legs. The white-legged Roundheads you buy tody have some Blue Moon and some Whitehackle in them. Judge Lacey gave me the chickens and game me money to bet at the fights. Several of the other fighters also gave me Roundheads. Back then the cockers all fought in the woods. Chickens were carried in tow sacks and the tow sacks were tied upright to trees so the chickens could stand up. You could find the fights by following the sounds of the roosters crowing. Judge Ed Long was President of the first National Bank in Jasper, Alabama and was also a probate Judge. He bred and fought Roundheads as did Judge Lacey. At one time Judge Long fought Judge Lacey a main in the woods on Judge Long's farm near the Warrior River. Judge Long won because he had the best conditioning. Both men were active chicken fighters. Both won a great many fights and both lost a great many too. One night a man named Ware got his chickens lost. I helped him find them in my Model T. He said he would send me some chickens, and he did send me nine. I took a Glover Keep and had my coops against the barn with no scratch pens. I was going to fight these against tough competition. Judge Lacey wouldn't go with me because he didn't think I could win and because he wouldn't bet against me. The Judge loaned me his handler. He was anxious to meet me when I got back. I won 8 out of 9 fights and $2,200. I had one hundred dollars to start with. At that time they made up pots, I doubled every time to cover the pots. In this bunch of cocks I had a great White Dom. This is where I got to love the White Doms. I moved from Jasper to Birmingham about 1920 and them moved to Atlanta, Georgia about 1924. It was there that I met Colonel Eugene Dickey an Attorney and a Mr. Hogg, a beer distributor. They took me to a derby at Albany, Georgia, and what proved to be a fight I shall always remember. The derby was held on a large country plantation and was attended by hundreds of people from all over the United States. The owner of the plantation killed cattle and hogs and fed all the people three meals a day. The meals were free and there was no charge for admission. The End.



    P.S. Maybe some of our new beginners and some semi-experienced cockers will understand where the very light and mottled or raven breast came from the blue blood in the Lacey Roundhead. The Shelton R.H., were originally Allen R.H. with some knobbed comb blue added. -R.W. "Hoot" Gibson.
    Reprinting this for not looking before I leaped

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    Re: for those who need it

    explains a lot about my muleskinners lol.

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    Re: for those who need it

    Good read.........................

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    Re: for those who need it

    Ol Albany Ga, not too far from me.

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    Re: for those who need it

    Quote Originally Posted by irisheyes485 View Post
    *I was setting around looking in my old books, today came across something and i thought some of u beginners might want to read, i hope it helps those who need it. The story is called "My Association with Judge Ernest Lacey" by Harry Charles. This story is taken from GameCock Mag. February 1978. By the late Mr. Harry Charles of Birmingham, Alabama. The true breeding of the Lacey Roundheads R.W. "Hoot" Gibson.

    My recollection of chicken fighting goes back almost 70 years. I was born in 1900 and started earning money when i was six years old by running errands and doing any small odd jobs. By the time i was 8 years old i was trading horses. At the age of 10, I owned a livery stable as the result of successful horse-trading. Judge Ernest Lacey was a probate jude in Jasper, Alabama. In 1910, he rented horses and buggies from me and took a liking to me. he started taking me to all the local chicken fights, and i soon learned to handle, spar and pit the chickens. The yellow-legged Roundheads were originated, to the best of my knowledge, by a man named Burrell Shelton who lived in Mississippi. Just after Shelton dies the owner of the Mountain Eagle newspaper in Jasper, Alabama, bought a setting of eggs from the widow. Judge Lacey bought the chickens hatched from these eggs and continued to breed the Roundheads. "These were known as the Side-Stepping Roundheads". Judge Lacey crossed these Roundhead with the Blue Moon chickens owned by a man named Moon who lived in Kentucky. He also crossed them with the Whitehackle, and these crosses all had white legs. The white-legged Roundheads you buy tody have some Blue Moon and some Whitehackle in them. Judge Lacey gave me the chickens and game me money to bet at the fights. Several of the other fighters also gave me Roundheads. Back then the cockers all fought in the woods. Chickens were carried in tow sacks and the tow sacks were tied upright to trees so the chickens could stand up. You could find the fights by following the sounds of the roosters crowing. Judge Ed Long was President of the first National Bank in Jasper, Alabama and was also a probate Judge. He bred and fought Roundheads as did Judge Lacey. At one time Judge Long fought Judge Lacey a main in the woods on Judge Long's farm near the Warrior River. Judge Long won because he had the best conditioning. Both men were active chicken fighters. Both won a great many fights and both lost a great many too. One night a man named Ware got his chickens lost. I helped him find them in my Model T. He said he would send me some chickens, and he did send me nine. I took a Glover Keep and had my coops against the barn with no scratch pens. I was going to fight these against tough competition. Judge Lacey wouldn't go with me because he didn't think I could win and because he wouldn't bet against me. The Judge loaned me his handler. He was anxious to meet me when I got back. I won 8 out of 9 fights and $2,200. I had one hundred dollars to start with. At that time they made up pots, I doubled every time to cover the pots. In this bunch of cocks I had a great White Dom. This is where I got to love the White Doms. I moved from Jasper to Birmingham about 1920 and them moved to Atlanta, Georgia about 1924. It was there that I met Colonel Eugene Dickey an Attorney and a Mr. Hogg, a beer distributor. They took me to a derby at Albany, Georgia, and what proved to be a fight I shall always remember. The derby was held on a large country plantation and was attended by hundreds of people from all over the United States. The owner of the plantation killed cattle and hogs and fed all the people three meals a day. The meals were free and there was no charge for admission. The End.



    P.S. Maybe some of our new beginners and some semi-experienced cockers will understand where the very light and mottled or raven breast came from the blue blood in the Lacey Roundhead. The Shelton R.H., were originally Allen R.H. with some knobbed comb blue added. -R.W. "Hoot" Gibson.
    reposting this the help get of the writing.

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    Re: for those who need it

    Good one post more if you got em

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    Re: for those who need it

    i got lots more for u fellers what would u like me to put up.most of what i have r all old breeds.i have a few of the new breeds but not many.

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    Re: for those who need it

    Come on fellers i will put up more storys i just would like to know what u gents would like to hear about.

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    Re: for those who need it

    Quote Originally Posted by irisheyes485 View Post
    Come on fellers i will put up more storys i just would like to know what u gents would like to hear about.
    Just keep them coming irisheyes485, I bet you have quite a few interesting ones.

    YFIS,

    yunke8888

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    Re: for those who need it

    Nice post we should make this thread a collection of choice articles from the old magazines

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    Re: for those who need it

    i have so many of these storys.but most r of old strains u dont see or hear of anymore.i have a few of the new breeds but when i say new breeds iam speaking of the CLARETS KELSOS etc...Old breds r gulls GENNET PYLES BOONE BLUE.GRIST GRADY FOWL ect...i agreevic5.o we should.i will put in if others would.

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    Re: for those who need it

    well its like the blue boones it was 1 cock bred back to hes daughter for 11 years that made them.

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    Re: for those who need it

    Henry Wortham Little Generals? Old family not heard of much?

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    Re: for those who need it

    Repost
    -Gameness (til the End)
    The Out and Out Kelso Family
    By Lou Elliott
    November 1974

    Walter A. Kelso, who died in 1964, fought his cocks under the entry name of Oleander – a type of flowering shrub that grows profusely in the semi-tropical climate of his home on Galveston Island, Texas.
    In the heyday of the pure old-time strains Kelso was a maverick. His Oleander cocks were simply a succession of battle crosses. For example, when John Madigin died in 1942, Kelso and Bill Japhet inherited all of his Clarets, Madigin Grays, and Texas Rangers. Most any breeder would do anything in his power to keep the stock pure.
    However, Kelso wrote, “I immediately began infusing new blood in the Madigin hens.” Kelso obtained his brood cocks from other breeders after he saw the cock fight. He was more interested in performance than he was the name of the strain. He would mate the new cock to a sister of his best pit cocks. If the cross was successful, he would add other sisters to the pen. More often than not, the pen produced worthless offspring and the cock was discarded.
    At any rate, that was the method used to produce the Out-and-Out Kelso family that is still the foundation stock for many of the best winning cocks fought in the major pits today. The Out-and-Out Kelso family was so-called because they were marked in the outside web of both feet. The cocks are generally black-breasted reds (ranging from a deep mahogany to light reds) with their white or yellow legs and pea or straight comb.
    About 1940, during the Orlando Tournament, Judge Ed Wilkins of San Antonio, Texas, fought a beautiful light blue Typewriter cock that won his first fight easily and was repeated to win a second fight on the same day. Kelso asked for and received this cock.
    The typewriters are a great family of game fowl made by crossing a Marsh Butcher cock over two Irish Blue hens from James G.Oakley of Alabama.
    The Butcher family is a cross of Grove Whitehackle (Lawman and Gilkerson) and the Marsh Gray Speeders, which are reported to be a combination of the old Santo Domingo Grays from the West Indies island of that name and Burnell Shelton’s old Knob comb Blues.
    The Typewriter cocks were placed on a walk with some of Hill McClanahan’s Claret Roundhead hens. A blue cock from this mating was bred in 1942 to two straight comb hens from Tom Murphy of Long Island, New York.
    Most of the cocks were Yankee Clippers that Bobby Schlesigner of Charlottesville, Virginia, had obtained from E.W. Law of Thomasville, Georgia. Duke offered to let Kelso have any of the Clipper cocks he liked. Kelso with Sweater McGinnis handling had met Schlesigner in his deciding fight at 1942 Orlando Tournament. Kelso won the fight and the Tournament but had been impressed with the quality of the Schlesinger cocks. Kelso passed up several of Duke’s easy winners and finally selected a cock that won against a Hatch cock after 58 fighting over an hour in the drag pit with the odds 100 to 40 against him.
    E.W. Law started these Yankee Clippers by crossing his Clarets with Dan O’Connell’s Albany fowl. This Albany family was made by mating some hens that were Hatch, Foley’s Ginger, Roundhead, and maybe some Pine Whitehackle (Stryker, mostly), with a Hardy Mahogany cock (Jim Thompson Mahogany and Kearney cross). The Yankee Clipper cock was mated to two of the Left-Out Kelso hens to produce the original Out-and-Out cocks that won 85 percent of their fights in major competition over a six-year period (1947 to 1953). These cocks were 1/2 Yankee Clipper, 1/4 Murphy, 1/8 Typewriter, 1/8 McClanahan.
    In 1951, Oleander won the Oaklawn Derby at Hot Springs, Arkansas, with a ten and two score. One of the Out-and-Out cocks won a quick battle and then was repeated to also win the deciding fight. In his second win, the cock broke the tip of his wing. This was the Broke wing cock that was mated back to three Murphy cross hens (probably from the Left-Out yards).
    In 1955, cocks from this Broke wing yard were fought in the Oaklawn Derby and Oleander won ten, lost two to split first money.
    At the Oaklawn Derby in 1956, Oleander won four lost four the first two days of fighting and then on the last, they had a full show of the pea-comb cocks from the Broke wing yard. They won four straight to tie for first money with the Van Horne entry of Kentucky. It just so happened that the Van Horne entry was using cocks bred by Curtis Blackwell out of a full brother to the four final Oleander winners.
    In 1957 Kelso advertised all of his fowl for sale except the cock he needed for the events he had promised to enter. In the ad, his bloodlines are listed as Murphy, McClanahan, Claret and Albany. It was rumored that the Broke wing yard went to a major cocker for $ 500.00.
    Kelso Pedigree Table
    by Gameness (til the End)
    Based on the articles posted on this post

    Broke Wing Kelso

    Peacomb

    before 1951
    Out and Out Kelso Hen

    before 1947

    Yellow Leg, White Leg, Straight Comb, Peacomb
    Yankee Clipper Cock

    Duke Hulsey
    via
    Bobby Schlesigner
    via
    E.W. Law
    Claret Cock

    E.W. Law
    Albany Hen

    Dan O’Connell
    Hardy Mahoganny Cock
    Mohaganny

    Jim Thompson
    Kearney cross
    Whitehackle

    Kearney
    Brown Red

    Kearney
    Hatch, Foley’s Ginger, Roundhead, Pine Whitehackle (Stryker) Hen
    Left Out Kelso Hen

    1942
    Blue Cock
    Typewriter Cock

    Judge Ed Wilkins

    San Antonio TX

    1940
    Butcher Cock

    Phil Marsh
    1869-1945
    Grey Speeder

    Phil Marsh
    1869-1945
    Old Knob Comb Blue

    Burnell Shelton
    Santo Domingo Grey
    Whitehackle

    Groves
    Whitehackle

    Lawman
    Whitehackle

    Gilkerson
    Irish Blue Hen

    James G. Oakley
    McClanahan Hen

    Hill McClanahan
    Claret

    Hill McClanahan
    Roundhead

    Hill McClanahan
    Whitehackle Hen

    Straight Comb

    Thomas Murphy
    Left Out Kelso Hen

    or

    Whitehackle Hen

    Straight Comb

    Thomas Murphy
    The Kelso Fowl
    by Gus Frithiof Sr.

    I have before me at this time letters from W. A. Kelso, Col. John Madigin, J.M. (Milo) Frost Jr., a letter from Gilbert Courtois, who fed the Kelso cocks for 25 years and many letter from my good friend John J. Liberto, Galveston, Texas, who made hundreds of single matings for Mr. Kelso; also helped him with brooders and incubators for 32 years. In writing this data on the Kelso fowl I am not drawing upon hearsay and my imagination for facts, but rather upon my long association with these great cockers and breeders.
    Mr. Kelso was not the kind of man who went around telling everyone he came in contact with how he bred his chickens. The only reference I ever came across from him was a letter that was published in The Gamecock magazine for April, 1964. He had written this letter to a personal friend, who sent it in for publication a couple months after Mr. Kelso’s death, Febuary 1, 1964. It was in regards to the breeding of one family of his fowl, the Oleander Peacomb Fowl.
    In the letter about the Oleander Peacomb Fowl he stated that he bred a Blue Judge Wilkins Typewriter – McClanahan cock to two Tom Murphy’s straight comb Whitehackle hens and produced the two red, “Left Out” marked hens that were later bred to a “Yankee Clipper” cock that Duke Hulsey gave him, which produced the original pea-comb fowl that won an average of 85% of their fights from 1947 to 1953.
    The above mentioned Blue Judge Wilkins Typewriter – McClanahan cock was bred out of my two Typewriter hens, bred to the McClanahan cock I brought down to Mr. Kelso’s place, and bred there and NO OTHER Typewriter cock or hens were bred there, and NO OTHER McClanahan cock or hens were bred down there. When I left Galveston, Texas, I left Mr. Kelso a large number of stags, bred out of my Typewriter hens and the McClanahan cock I brought down there to breed to my hens. Kelso fought my fowl (young cocks) against Bobby Manziel, deceased, and they won a great main, fed by Turley Stalcup of Tennessee. Mr. Stalcup wrote me of the results of that main and asked me for hens bred the same way.
    I have many letters here from John J. Liberto, who helped Mr. Kelso for 32 years with his fowl, in Galveston, Texas, and he assures me that the only Typewriter hens of and the McClanahan cock (Austin-Claret-Smith Roundhead) was ever bred at Mr. Kelso’s, or by him down there.
    Hundreds of men have written me about the Kelso Clarets, some saying they have them, others wanting information on them. Although Kelso had many of Madigin’s fowl he never bred any of them pure, as he always wanted his own strain of fowl and bred towards this goal. I know this will surprise many, but there is no such fowl, as Kelso (Madigin) Clarets. However, some of his “Battle Cocks” contained some Claret blood.
    I fed a 13-cock main for Mr. Kelso against Gilbert Courtois, New Iberia, LA, which was fought at the Club Belvedere, near Erath, LA, which ended in a draw. Gilbert Courtois had won many mians at that time and was rated the Champion of Louisiana. The Kelso cocks I trained were half E.H. Hulsey (Pumpkins), one quarter Smith Roundheads (DeJeans) and one quarter Madigin Claret.
    Kelso made a main against Smutt Griffiths, Victoria, Texas; Jeff Lankard, Goliad, Texas, and others in their combination. It was a “show” of 21 and 17 pairs matched. Sam Bigham and Henry Wortham visited Kelso’s cock-house and he extended them the courtesy of examining his cocks. When Kelso asked them what they though the results would be they replied, after prompting – that they felt I had “Drawn” the cocks too much and that the cocks Kelso was meeting were absolutely perfect. After Wortham and Bingham left the cock-house we soon heard the bets of 100/60 and 1000/six hundred offered. Madigin drove up and asked why the big odds. I told him that the experts had felt of Kelso’s cocks and thought we had no chance. I then handed Madigin some of the cocks and he looked them over. As he was leaving the cock-house, Mr. Kelso asked him what he thought about them. He replied, “I am going to break these smart betters.” J.M. Frost had an interest in our main, but withdrew his support and went with the opposition. The final score was Frithiof-Kelso 11 and Griffith-Lankard 6. We won the only hack after the main and Kelso and Madigin won a great deal on the main as they were my only backers.
    I used 3 of J.M. Frost’s Pipeliners in the main and the rest were E.H. Hulsey-Smith Roundhead-Madigin Claret crosses.
    Sweater McGinnis teamed up with Tom Averyt (feeder for Hill McClanahan), J.M. Frost Jr., (Pipeliner and Frost Greys), Judge Ed Wilkins (Typewriters) and other backers and challenged Kelso to fight them for a thousand dollars on each battle. We fought at Austin, Texas. We defeated the combination 8 to 3. I used one Madigin Grey that won and the rest were E.H. Hulsey-Coutois-DeJean-Smith Roundhead-Claret crosses.
    When Kelso fought a main against Madigin in New Orleans his cocks were Roundheads from Louisiana. Madigin won the main 11 to 6. The Madigin Clarets completely outclassed the LA Roundheads.
    Kelso fought four E.H. Hulsey cocks and one Madigin Grey cock against Judge Edward Wilkins at Austin, Texas late one season. Wilkins used 5 cocks, one half Marsh Butcher and one half Typewriter. The Hulsey cocks were pumpkins (Yellow Birchen color), all lost, the Madigin Grey won.
    In 11 mains and hacks after the mains, I fought Wilkins over 150 battles. He told me only 5 cocks of this sum were, or had any Butcher blood in them, and this should refute the allegation of two of the “self appointed experts,” who wrote articles for The Gamecock that stated that the Wilkins cocks were either 100% Marsh Butcher, or one half Butcher.
    Appearing in August, 1946 Grit & Steel is a report of a 9 stag main, page 36, between Walter Kelso, Gilbert Courtois feeding, and Maurice Cohen, San Antonio, Texas, fought at Berg’s Mill San Antonio, Texas. Won by Kelso 6 to 3. Kelso used 5 stags bred by John Liberto, Galveston, Texas.
    In the Febuary issue G&S, page 67, 1948, is a report of a main fought between Regels & Co., Alice, Texas, fed by Lee (pop) McGinnis, “Skeeter” Alford handling, against Walter Kelso, Gilbert Courtois feeding and handling for Kelso. Score 5 to 4 for Kelso. Kelso used 4 cocks bred by John Liberto, Galveston, texas.
    The reason I mentioned the mains fed by myself and those fed by Gilbert Courtois for Mr. Kelso, was to show the readers that Mr. Kelso was NOT FIGHTING COL. JOHN H. MADIGIN CLARETS in any of his important mains.
    Upon the death of Mr. Madigin, September 16, 1942, Mr. Kelso fell heir to his fowl, which surprised many, as all thought Mr. E.W. Law would inherit them. Madigin didn’t relish Mr. Law selling fowl and perhaps, this influenced his decision. Madigin’s instructions were that Frank Heiland, who fed his cocks for many years, was to be given a trio of Greys and Bill Japhet, son of his old time friend, Dan Japhet, was to be given some of the fowl if he wanted them.
    Kelso had “Sweater” McGinnis with him at the time. McGinnis didn’t like the Madigin fowl and was busy killing them. He did fight some of them at Waco, Texas and most lost.
    When I was with Mr. Kelso, Col. Madigin would bring down a dozen or more cocks and I would place them in big pens to “freshen them up.” After they had been on green grass for a month I would put them up and work them out and fight them in New Orleans Tournaments for Madigin. He would bring his green legged Regular Greys and Red and White Clarets, usually an equal number of each color. Madigin told me many times that his Red and White Clarets were the same identical fowl, bred exactly the same, contained the same blood-lines.
    Madigin had a dozen hens down there in large pens (Kelso’s place) and we went after them while I was with Madigin. However, when I went with Kelso there were no pure Claret fowl down there and I doubt that Kelso bred from them.
    Madigin believed that fowl bred in Canada, where he bred his fowl, and brought down to Texas, would improve them, because of the difference in climate, minerals in the ground and in the grass, would be beneficial to them.
    Sweater McGinnis brought down to Kelso’s place a Peacomb red, yellow legged cock, heavy plumage, long wings and broad back. He was bred to Kelso’s “Out and Out” marked hens and single mated to the little bluff, straight comb, Murphy hens. This cock was called the “Sweater” cock.
    McGinnis got a Regular Grey Madigin cock from Kelso. John Liberto, Galeston, Texas, had been breeding the cock to his Pipeline (Frost) hens for Mr. Kelso. A Perfection Grey cock was also bred to Pipeliner hens for Kelso’s use. The original Madigin Perfection Greys were out of a Madigin Regular Grey named “Perfection,” bred to Red Clarets hens.
    When Walter Kelso (Oleander Club), Gilbert Courtois feeding, won the Sunset Derby in 1952, he fought 6 Yankee Clippers (Claret-Albany’s), 3 Claret crosses and 3 Griffin cocks. The Bob Angelle trophy was given to Gilbert Courtois. (May issue G&S, page 17, 1952.)
    May 6, 1953, Kelso (Oleander Club), Courtois feeding, won a main against Mr. Halff, J.D. Perry feeding, at Nine Mile Club, 6 to 4. Kelso used some of his “Little Murphy” cocks and Oleander Reds, which were Typewriter-McClanahan. Old Murphy, Yankee Clipper and Claret blood. June issue, Gamecock, page 44.
    Mr. Kelso obtained from Billy Ruble, a peacomb, Brown Red, dark legged cock, twice a winner at Hot Springs, same day, and he was bred to the dark legged hens Tommy Murphy sent Kelso. The cocks were very game but average fighters. Tommy Gillespie, editor of the Game Fowl Breeders Journal, had been trying to get some Kelso fowl from the caretaker on Kelso’s place. Kelso told his caretaker to sell them to Gillespie and keep the money.
    The Ruble cock was then bred to Kelso’s best Buff, straight comb hens and the cocks were satisfactory. Best “Left Out” marked little hens.
    John Liberto let Kelso breed his dark wine red, straight comb yellow Pipeliner (Frost cock to his buff, yellow legged, Murphy hens). Sweater McGinnis fought the cock twice. After Sweater left Kelso’s place to go into the army Gilbert Courtois bred him for Kelso for a few years. Kelso won mains and derbies with this mating. Later a son of the Pipeliner cock was bred the same way with excellent results. The blood of this line of fowl was in his later fowl, his very best fowl.
    Mr. Griffin from Alabama was walking stags for Mr. Kelso and he sent Kelso a bright red, single comb cock, that was a sensation, a five-time winner, called the Trosclair cock, because Trosclair had walked him; he was also called the $1000 cock. Griffin also sent Kelso a dark red, peacomb, white legged cock, extra good. Some offspring from these cocks was raised and they were satisfactory.
    A Hennie Mathesius Hatch cock was bred by John Liberto to his Pipeliner (Frost) hens and Kelso used many of them with good results.
    Mr. Armand DeJean, Opelousas, LA, gave Kelso some of his Smith Roundheads and Kelso gave them to John Liberto. Later Kelso got some of them back again. I think some of the cocks I was fighting for Mr. Kelso carried this blood line.
    One of the Grey cocks Kelso used for his Grey colored cocks was from Carl Van Wormer, Houston, Texas. He was a Shake and fought several times. Van Wormer rented Col. Madigin’s place in Houston, Texas, after Mr. Madigin’s death, from Madigin’s daughter. When I visited him there he had fowl from E.W. Law, Dave Ward, Frank Shy (Narragansett) and some Albany fowl (Old Albanys). Van Wormer joined me in 5 mains, all of which I won. I let him have a Madigin Grey cock, sire of 5 cocks I fought against E.H. Husley and Henry Wortham, at Arcola, Texas, in our $2000 main. Four of my Grey cocks won – the 5th cock met a 9 time winning Hulsey cock, they went up, came down flopping, dying and it was called a draw. Wortham said they were the best Grey cocks he ever saw fight in any pit. I don’t know for sure if that Grey cock Kelso got was out of my cock, or form E.W. Law stock.
    This is the true way Kelso bred his fighting cocks and they were TOPS.

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    Re: for those who need it

    i hope some find what they r looking for.

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    Re: for those who need it

    Quote Originally Posted by irisheyes485 View Post
    i have so many of these storys.but most r of old strains u dont see or hear of anymore.i have a few of the new breeds but when i say new breeds iam speaking of the CLARETS KELSOS etc...Old breds r gulls GENNET PYLES BOONE BLUE.GRIST GRADY FOWL ect...i agreevic5.o we should.i will put in if others would.
    Im interested in the Wisconsin red shufflers. Do you have anything on that? Also would like to know what breed of fowl throw dark eyes

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    yes Jumpah808 i have the whole story on the Wisconsin red shufflers.

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  33. #23
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    Re: for those who need it

    i can tell u now they have cuban blood in them

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    Re: for those who need it

    Any reputable breeders of them currently?

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    Re: for those who need it

    Quote Originally Posted by irisheyes485 View Post
    Repost
    -Gameness (til the End)
    The Out and Out Kelso Family
    By Lou Elliott
    November 1974

    Walter A. Kelso, who died in 1964, fought his cocks under the entry name of Oleander – a type of flowering shrub that grows profusely in the semi-tropical climate of his home on Galveston Island, Texas.
    In the heyday of the pure old-time strains Kelso was a maverick. His Oleander cocks were simply a succession of battle crosses. For example, when John Madigin died in 1942, Kelso and Bill Japhet inherited all of his Clarets, Madigin Grays, and Texas Rangers. Most any breeder would do anything in his power to keep the stock pure.
    However, Kelso wrote, “I immediately began infusing new blood in the Madigin hens.” Kelso obtained his brood cocks from other breeders after he saw the cock fight. He was more interested in performance than he was the name of the strain. He would mate the new cock to a sister of his best pit cocks. If the cross was successful, he would add other sisters to the pen. More often than not, the pen produced worthless offspring and the cock was discarded.
    At any rate, that was the method used to produce the Out-and-Out Kelso family that is still the foundation stock for many of the best winning cocks fought in the major pits today. The Out-and-Out Kelso family was so-called because they were marked in the outside web of both feet. The cocks are generally black-breasted reds (ranging from a deep mahogany to light reds) with their white or yellow legs and pea or straight comb.
    About 1940, during the Orlando Tournament, Judge Ed Wilkins of San Antonio, Texas, fought a beautiful light blue Typewriter cock that won his first fight easily and was repeated to win a second fight on the same day. Kelso asked for and received this cock.
    The typewriters are a great family of game fowl made by crossing a Marsh Butcher cock over two Irish Blue hens from James G.Oakley of Alabama.
    The Butcher family is a cross of Grove Whitehackle (Lawman and Gilkerson) and the Marsh Gray Speeders, which are reported to be a combination of the old Santo Domingo Grays from the West Indies island of that name and Burnell Shelton’s old Knob comb Blues.
    The Typewriter cocks were placed on a walk with some of Hill McClanahan’s Claret Roundhead hens. A blue cock from this mating was bred in 1942 to two straight comb hens from Tom Murphy of Long Island, New York.
    Most of the cocks were Yankee Clippers that Bobby Schlesigner of Charlottesville, Virginia, had obtained from E.W. Law of Thomasville, Georgia. Duke offered to let Kelso have any of the Clipper cocks he liked. Kelso with Sweater McGinnis handling had met Schlesigner in his deciding fight at 1942 Orlando Tournament. Kelso won the fight and the Tournament but had been impressed with the quality of the Schlesinger cocks. Kelso passed up several of Duke’s easy winners and finally selected a cock that won against a Hatch cock after 58 fighting over an hour in the drag pit with the odds 100 to 40 against him.
    E.W. Law started these Yankee Clippers by crossing his Clarets with Dan O’Connell’s Albany fowl. This Albany family was made by mating some hens that were Hatch, Foley’s Ginger, Roundhead, and maybe some Pine Whitehackle (Stryker, mostly), with a Hardy Mahogany cock (Jim Thompson Mahogany and Kearney cross). The Yankee Clipper cock was mated to two of the Left-Out Kelso hens to produce the original Out-and-Out cocks that won 85 percent of their fights in major competition over a six-year period (1947 to 1953). These cocks were 1/2 Yankee Clipper, 1/4 Murphy, 1/8 Typewriter, 1/8 McClanahan.
    In 1951, Oleander won the Oaklawn Derby at Hot Springs, Arkansas, with a ten and two score. One of the Out-and-Out cocks won a quick battle and then was repeated to also win the deciding fight. In his second win, the cock broke the tip of his wing. This was the Broke wing cock that was mated back to three Murphy cross hens (probably from the Left-Out yards).
    In 1955, cocks from this Broke wing yard were fought in the Oaklawn Derby and Oleander won ten, lost two to split first money.
    At the Oaklawn Derby in 1956, Oleander won four lost four the first two days of fighting and then on the last, they had a full show of the pea-comb cocks from the Broke wing yard. They won four straight to tie for first money with the Van Horne entry of Kentucky. It just so happened that the Van Horne entry was using cocks bred by Curtis Blackwell out of a full brother to the four final Oleander winners.
    In 1957 Kelso advertised all of his fowl for sale except the cock he needed for the events he had promised to enter. In the ad, his bloodlines are listed as Murphy, McClanahan, Claret and Albany. It was rumored that the Broke wing yard went to a major cocker for $ 500.00.
    Kelso Pedigree Table
    by Gameness (til the End)
    Based on the articles posted on this post

    Broke Wing Kelso

    Peacomb

    before 1951
    Out and Out Kelso Hen

    before 1947

    Yellow Leg, White Leg, Straight Comb, Peacomb
    Yankee Clipper Cock

    Duke Hulsey
    via
    Bobby Schlesigner
    via
    E.W. Law
    Claret Cock

    E.W. Law
    Albany Hen

    Dan O’Connell
    Hardy Mahoganny Cock
    Mohaganny

    Jim Thompson
    Kearney cross
    Whitehackle

    Kearney
    Brown Red

    Kearney
    Hatch, Foley’s Ginger, Roundhead, Pine Whitehackle (Stryker) Hen
    Left Out Kelso Hen

    1942
    Blue Cock
    Typewriter Cock

    Judge Ed Wilkins

    San Antonio TX

    1940
    Butcher Cock

    Phil Marsh
    1869-1945
    Grey Speeder

    Phil Marsh
    1869-1945
    Old Knob Comb Blue

    Burnell Shelton
    Santo Domingo Grey
    Whitehackle

    Groves
    Whitehackle

    Lawman
    Whitehackle

    Gilkerson
    Irish Blue Hen

    James G. Oakley
    McClanahan Hen

    Hill McClanahan
    Claret

    Hill McClanahan
    Roundhead

    Hill McClanahan
    Whitehackle Hen

    Straight Comb

    Thomas Murphy
    Left Out Kelso Hen

    or

    Whitehackle Hen

    Straight Comb

    Thomas Murphy
    The Kelso Fowl
    by Gus Frithiof Sr.

    I have before me at this time letters from W. A. Kelso, Col. John Madigin, J.M. (Milo) Frost Jr., a letter from Gilbert Courtois, who fed the Kelso cocks for 25 years and many letter from my good friend John J. Liberto, Galveston, Texas, who made hundreds of single matings for Mr. Kelso; also helped him with brooders and incubators for 32 years. In writing this data on the Kelso fowl I am not drawing upon hearsay and my imagination for facts, but rather upon my long association with these great cockers and breeders.
    Mr. Kelso was not the kind of man who went around telling everyone he came in contact with how he bred his chickens. The only reference I ever came across from him was a letter that was published in The Gamecock magazine for April, 1964. He had written this letter to a personal friend, who sent it in for publication a couple months after Mr. Kelso’s death, Febuary 1, 1964. It was in regards to the breeding of one family of his fowl, the Oleander Peacomb Fowl.
    In the letter about the Oleander Peacomb Fowl he stated that he bred a Blue Judge Wilkins Typewriter – McClanahan cock to two Tom Murphy’s straight comb Whitehackle hens and produced the two red, “Left Out” marked hens that were later bred to a “Yankee Clipper” cock that Duke Hulsey gave him, which produced the original pea-comb fowl that won an average of 85% of their fights from 1947 to 1953.
    The above mentioned Blue Judge Wilkins Typewriter – McClanahan cock was bred out of my two Typewriter hens, bred to the McClanahan cock I brought down to Mr. Kelso’s place, and bred there and NO OTHER Typewriter cock or hens were bred there, and NO OTHER McClanahan cock or hens were bred down there. When I left Galveston, Texas, I left Mr. Kelso a large number of stags, bred out of my Typewriter hens and the McClanahan cock I brought down there to breed to my hens. Kelso fought my fowl (young cocks) against Bobby Manziel, deceased, and they won a great main, fed by Turley Stalcup of Tennessee. Mr. Stalcup wrote me of the results of that main and asked me for hens bred the same way.
    I have many letters here from John J. Liberto, who helped Mr. Kelso for 32 years with his fowl, in Galveston, Texas, and he assures me that the only Typewriter hens of and the McClanahan cock (Austin-Claret-Smith Roundhead) was ever bred at Mr. Kelso’s, or by him down there.
    Hundreds of men have written me about the Kelso Clarets, some saying they have them, others wanting information on them. Although Kelso had many of Madigin’s fowl he never bred any of them pure, as he always wanted his own strain of fowl and bred towards this goal. I know this will surprise many, but there is no such fowl, as Kelso (Madigin) Clarets. However, some of his “Battle Cocks” contained some Claret blood.
    I fed a 13-cock main for Mr. Kelso against Gilbert Courtois, New Iberia, LA, which was fought at the Club Belvedere, near Erath, LA, which ended in a draw. Gilbert Courtois had won many mians at that time and was rated the Champion of Louisiana. The Kelso cocks I trained were half E.H. Hulsey (Pumpkins), one quarter Smith Roundheads (DeJeans) and one quarter Madigin Claret.
    Kelso made a main against Smutt Griffiths, Victoria, Texas; Jeff Lankard, Goliad, Texas, and others in their combination. It was a “show” of 21 and 17 pairs matched. Sam Bigham and Henry Wortham visited Kelso’s cock-house and he extended them the courtesy of examining his cocks. When Kelso asked them what they though the results would be they replied, after prompting – that they felt I had “Drawn” the cocks too much and that the cocks Kelso was meeting were absolutely perfect. After Wortham and Bingham left the cock-house we soon heard the bets of 100/60 and 1000/six hundred offered. Madigin drove up and asked why the big odds. I told him that the experts had felt of Kelso’s cocks and thought we had no chance. I then handed Madigin some of the cocks and he looked them over. As he was leaving the cock-house, Mr. Kelso asked him what he thought about them. He replied, “I am going to break these smart betters.” J.M. Frost had an interest in our main, but withdrew his support and went with the opposition. The final score was Frithiof-Kelso 11 and Griffith-Lankard 6. We won the only hack after the main and Kelso and Madigin won a great deal on the main as they were my only backers.
    I used 3 of J.M. Frost’s Pipeliners in the main and the rest were E.H. Hulsey-Smith Roundhead-Madigin Claret crosses.
    Sweater McGinnis teamed up with Tom Averyt (feeder for Hill McClanahan), J.M. Frost Jr., (Pipeliner and Frost Greys), Judge Ed Wilkins (Typewriters) and other backers and challenged Kelso to fight them for a thousand dollars on each battle. We fought at Austin, Texas. We defeated the combination 8 to 3. I used one Madigin Grey that won and the rest were E.H. Hulsey-Coutois-DeJean-Smith Roundhead-Claret crosses.
    When Kelso fought a main against Madigin in New Orleans his cocks were Roundheads from Louisiana. Madigin won the main 11 to 6. The Madigin Clarets completely outclassed the LA Roundheads.
    Kelso fought four E.H. Hulsey cocks and one Madigin Grey cock against Judge Edward Wilkins at Austin, Texas late one season. Wilkins used 5 cocks, one half Marsh Butcher and one half Typewriter. The Hulsey cocks were pumpkins (Yellow Birchen color), all lost, the Madigin Grey won.
    In 11 mains and hacks after the mains, I fought Wilkins over 150 battles. He told me only 5 cocks of this sum were, or had any Butcher blood in them, and this should refute the allegation of two of the “self appointed experts,” who wrote articles for The Gamecock that stated that the Wilkins cocks were either 100% Marsh Butcher, or one half Butcher.
    Appearing in August, 1946 Grit & Steel is a report of a 9 stag main, page 36, between Walter Kelso, Gilbert Courtois feeding, and Maurice Cohen, San Antonio, Texas, fought at Berg’s Mill San Antonio, Texas. Won by Kelso 6 to 3. Kelso used 5 stags bred by John Liberto, Galveston, Texas.
    In the Febuary issue G&S, page 67, 1948, is a report of a main fought between Regels & Co., Alice, Texas, fed by Lee (pop) McGinnis, “Skeeter” Alford handling, against Walter Kelso, Gilbert Courtois feeding and handling for Kelso. Score 5 to 4 for Kelso. Kelso used 4 cocks bred by John Liberto, Galveston, texas.
    The reason I mentioned the mains fed by myself and those fed by Gilbert Courtois for Mr. Kelso, was to show the readers that Mr. Kelso was NOT FIGHTING COL. JOHN H. MADIGIN CLARETS in any of his important mains.
    Upon the death of Mr. Madigin, September 16, 1942, Mr. Kelso fell heir to his fowl, which surprised many, as all thought Mr. E.W. Law would inherit them. Madigin didn’t relish Mr. Law selling fowl and perhaps, this influenced his decision. Madigin’s instructions were that Frank Heiland, who fed his cocks for many years, was to be given a trio of Greys and Bill Japhet, son of his old time friend, Dan Japhet, was to be given some of the fowl if he wanted them.
    Kelso had “Sweater” McGinnis with him at the time. McGinnis didn’t like the Madigin fowl and was busy killing them. He did fight some of them at Waco, Texas and most lost.
    When I was with Mr. Kelso, Col. Madigin would bring down a dozen or more cocks and I would place them in big pens to “freshen them up.” After they had been on green grass for a month I would put them up and work them out and fight them in New Orleans Tournaments for Madigin. He would bring his green legged Regular Greys and Red and White Clarets, usually an equal number of each color. Madigin told me many times that his Red and White Clarets were the same identical fowl, bred exactly the same, contained the same blood-lines.
    Madigin had a dozen hens down there in large pens (Kelso’s place) and we went after them while I was with Madigin. However, when I went with Kelso there were no pure Claret fowl down there and I doubt that Kelso bred from them.
    Madigin believed that fowl bred in Canada, where he bred his fowl, and brought down to Texas, would improve them, because of the difference in climate, minerals in the ground and in the grass, would be beneficial to them.
    Sweater McGinnis brought down to Kelso’s place a Peacomb red, yellow legged cock, heavy plumage, long wings and broad back. He was bred to Kelso’s “Out and Out” marked hens and single mated to the little bluff, straight comb, Murphy hens. This cock was called the “Sweater” cock.
    McGinnis got a Regular Grey Madigin cock from Kelso. John Liberto, Galeston, Texas, had been breeding the cock to his Pipeline (Frost) hens for Mr. Kelso. A Perfection Grey cock was also bred to Pipeliner hens for Kelso’s use. The original Madigin Perfection Greys were out of a Madigin Regular Grey named “Perfection,” bred to Red Clarets hens.
    When Walter Kelso (Oleander Club), Gilbert Courtois feeding, won the Sunset Derby in 1952, he fought 6 Yankee Clippers (Claret-Albany’s), 3 Claret crosses and 3 Griffin cocks. The Bob Angelle trophy was given to Gilbert Courtois. (May issue G&S, page 17, 1952.)
    May 6, 1953, Kelso (Oleander Club), Courtois feeding, won a main against Mr. Halff, J.D. Perry feeding, at Nine Mile Club, 6 to 4. Kelso used some of his “Little Murphy” cocks and Oleander Reds, which were Typewriter-McClanahan. Old Murphy, Yankee Clipper and Claret blood. June issue, Gamecock, page 44.
    Mr. Kelso obtained from Billy Ruble, a peacomb, Brown Red, dark legged cock, twice a winner at Hot Springs, same day, and he was bred to the dark legged hens Tommy Murphy sent Kelso. The cocks were very game but average fighters. Tommy Gillespie, editor of the Game Fowl Breeders Journal, had been trying to get some Kelso fowl from the caretaker on Kelso’s place. Kelso told his caretaker to sell them to Gillespie and keep the money.
    The Ruble cock was then bred to Kelso’s best Buff, straight comb hens and the cocks were satisfactory. Best “Left Out” marked little hens.
    John Liberto let Kelso breed his dark wine red, straight comb yellow Pipeliner (Frost cock to his buff, yellow legged, Murphy hens). Sweater McGinnis fought the cock twice. After Sweater left Kelso’s place to go into the army Gilbert Courtois bred him for Kelso for a few years. Kelso won mains and derbies with this mating. Later a son of the Pipeliner cock was bred the same way with excellent results. The blood of this line of fowl was in his later fowl, his very best fowl.
    Mr. Griffin from Alabama was walking stags for Mr. Kelso and he sent Kelso a bright red, single comb cock, that was a sensation, a five-time winner, called the Trosclair cock, because Trosclair had walked him; he was also called the $1000 cock. Griffin also sent Kelso a dark red, peacomb, white legged cock, extra good. Some offspring from these cocks was raised and they were satisfactory.
    A Hennie Mathesius Hatch cock was bred by John Liberto to his Pipeliner (Frost) hens and Kelso used many of them with good results.
    Mr. Armand DeJean, Opelousas, LA, gave Kelso some of his Smith Roundheads and Kelso gave them to John Liberto. Later Kelso got some of them back again. I think some of the cocks I was fighting for Mr. Kelso carried this blood line.
    One of the Grey cocks Kelso used for his Grey colored cocks was from Carl Van Wormer, Houston, Texas. He was a Shake and fought several times. Van Wormer rented Col. Madigin’s place in Houston, Texas, after Mr. Madigin’s death, from Madigin’s daughter. When I visited him there he had fowl from E.W. Law, Dave Ward, Frank Shy (Narragansett) and some Albany fowl (Old Albanys). Van Wormer joined me in 5 mains, all of which I won. I let him have a Madigin Grey cock, sire of 5 cocks I fought against E.H. Husley and Henry Wortham, at Arcola, Texas, in our $2000 main. Four of my Grey cocks won – the 5th cock met a 9 time winning Hulsey cock, they went up, came down flopping, dying and it was called a draw. Wortham said they were the best Grey cocks he ever saw fight in any pit. I don’t know for sure if that Grey cock Kelso got was out of my cock, or form E.W. Law stock.
    This is the true way Kelso bred his fighting cocks and they were TOPS.
    My grandpa and his brother got our kelsos and Mcleans from Gus in 1978 and again in 1980. Still have them today

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    Ok jumpah808 here is the foundation stock that got the shufflers started.john d pierce grow up in the fox river valley.in 1887 pierce ordered a trio of new macks from a man named f.w. Mcdugall of indianapolis. The stag was a dark deep red rooster with a very dark face,the pullets were also very dark brown with red hacks. In 1889, he got a cork irish cock from a col.g perk huddleston, of lebanon tenn. He breed this cock to both new mack hen's this is the original foundation of the wisconsin red shuffler's. The following year he breed the new mack cock over 3 1/2 seven strain inside red 1/2 cork irish hen'sthere is some more that was added like the cuban doms.but this is the foundation stock that made them.i hope this helps u sir.

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  40. #27
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    a lot of folks think it was the red cuban when it was the doms that was added.

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    Re: for those who need it

    Let's hear what you have on gulls

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    Quote Originally Posted by irisheyes485 View Post
    *I was setting around looking in my old books, today came across something and i thought some of u beginners might want to read, i hope it helps those who need it. The story is called "My Association with Judge Ernest Lacey" by Harry Charles. This story is taken from GameCock Mag. February 1978. By the late Mr. Harry Charles of Birmingham, Alabama. The true breeding of the Lacey Roundheads R.W. "Hoot" Gibson.

    My recollection of chicken fighting goes back almost 70 years. I was born in 1900 and started earning money when i was six years old by running errands and doing any small odd jobs. By the time i was 8 years old i was trading horses. At the age of 10, I owned a livery stable as the result of successful horse-trading. Judge Ernest Lacey was a probate jude in Jasper, Alabama. In 1910, he rented horses and buggies from me and took a liking to me. he started taking me to all the local chicken fights, and i soon learned to handle, spar and pit the chickens. The yellow-legged Roundheads were originated, to the best of my knowledge, by a man named Burrell Shelton who lived in Mississippi. Just after Shelton dies the owner of the Mountain Eagle newspaper in Jasper, Alabama, bought a setting of eggs from the widow. Judge Lacey bought the chickens hatched from these eggs and continued to breed the Roundheads. "These were known as the Side-Stepping Roundheads". Judge Lacey crossed these Roundhead with the Blue Moon chickens owned by a man named Moon who lived in Kentucky. He also crossed them with the Whitehackle, and these crosses all had white legs. The white-legged Roundheads you buy tody have some Blue Moon and some Whitehackle in them. Judge Lacey gave me the chickens and game me money to bet at the fights. Several of the other fighters also gave me Roundheads. Back then the cockers all fought in the woods. Chickens were carried in tow sacks and the tow sacks were tied upright to trees so the chickens could stand up. You could find the fights by following the sounds of the roosters crowing. Judge Ed Long was President of the first National Bank in Jasper, Alabama and was also a probate Judge. He bred and fought Roundheads as did Judge Lacey. At one time Judge Long fought Judge Lacey a main in the woods on Judge Long's farm near the Warrior River. Judge Long won because he had the best conditioning. Both men were active chicken fighters. Both won a great many fights and both lost a great many too. One night a man named Ware got his chickens lost. I helped him find them in my Model T. He said he would send me some chickens, and he did send me nine. I took a Glover Keep and had my coops against the barn with no scratch pens. I was going to fight these against tough competition. Judge Lacey wouldn't go with me because he didn't think I could win and because he wouldn't bet against me. The Judge loaned me his handler. He was anxious to meet me when I got back. I won 8 out of 9 fights and $2,200. I had one hundred dollars to start with. At that time they made up pots, I doubled every time to cover the pots. In this bunch of cocks I had a great White Dom. This is where I got to love the White Doms. I moved from Jasper to Birmingham about 1920 and them moved to Atlanta, Georgia about 1924. It was there that I met Colonel Eugene Dickey an Attorney and a Mr. Hogg, a beer distributor. They took me to a derby at Albany, Georgia, and what proved to be a fight I shall always remember. The derby was held on a large country plantation and was attended by hundreds of people from all over the United States. The owner of the plantation killed cattle and hogs and fed all the people three meals a day. The meals were free and there was no charge for admission. The End.



    P.S. Maybe some of our new beginners and some semi-experienced cockers will understand where the very light and mottled or raven breast came from the blue blood in the Lacey Roundhead. The Shelton R.H., were originally Allen R.H. with some knobbed comb blue added. -R.W. "Hoot" Gibson.
    I will be putting up more of these stories for y'all. I hope this one has helped a few

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    Re: for those who need it

    Ok t gasparac I will look it up for you. I can tell you now that the gulls r a cross of Earl Derby and Irish derby.that came straight from Mahoney himself. I said this before so here goes.Mahoney had a friend named Gennett.he was known in New York as gangster.he also had game fowl.they were the first Pyle's that were known of.they say he won them in a poker game.others say they were gifted to him not killing a man.gennett was a hit man.anyway.Gennett killed a man andran to canada.he gave Mahoney the Pyle's to keep for him.this is where the Canadian blood comes into play.they would trade fowl back and fourth.gennett got killed some years later for the life he lived.this not all the story.but it's what you ask for.i hope it helps you I will put up what Mahoney said himself if you boys like.

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