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Thread: Marek’s Disease help

  
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    Marek’s Disease help

    I have a couple questions regarding Marek’s that I couldn’t find the answer for.

    1. If I buy fowl from a breeder that vaccinates for Mareks, should I also start vaccinating for it?
    2. If a chick is vaccinated for Marek’s does it become a carrier and spreader of the disease?

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Friend, I wouldn't buy chicks that were vaccinated for Mareks as they don't have a strong immune system and you'll always have to vaccinate for it. Best to get chicks from a good small time breeder with solid birds that doesn't have to vaccinate as he culls all sick ones. The axe is the best vaccine

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Sir,
    Im not sure I qualify to give a 100% sure fire answer.. I did have and raise gamefowl for several years... If you buy vaccinated brood fowl?, then no you don't have to vaccinate
    them, if you raise chicks out them, regardless it is a good idea to vaccinate all that you raise, as a carrier im not sure, all it does is build immunity to Marek's just like polio shots do in humans...I guess you could say in a sense that they would be carriers. Hope this helps, you know the old saying, an ounce of prevention is worth a
    pound of cure..Wish you well.

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    Senior Member Al Sanchez's Avatar
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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    In my Opinion its like saying If you vaccinate for Fowl Pox it makes them Carriers. This is Hog wash. If you choose to Vaccinate, Vaccinate your Whole flock.. If you get birds from someone that have been vaccinated for anything. Don't worry about it. Its not going to Spread to your Flock.. Now birds being exposed to sick birds that's a whole different story.. I only vaccinate my chicks every year for Pox. I don't feel the need to vaccinate for anything else.. I keep a Closed Flock, by this I mean I don't buy birds and bring them on my Property period.. Just my opinion..

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Marek's vacc. Is in a killed form, so it does not shed to other birds. It has been stated many times that you can keep turkeys with your fowl and that will protect them from marek's because marek's is a turkey virus . The marek's shot must be given with-in the first 24 hr's after hatching.that is why i try to incubate all my crossed chix. I myself only vacc. For marek's . I know some of you need pox vacc. As well depending where you live. I do not vacc. Chix from my brood fowl. Over a period of time your brood fowl will have less and less marek's as long as you do not infuse different genes into your brood fowl.their are commercial lines of fowl that have a very high resistance to marek's in this way.
    Last edited by bootlegger; October 24th, 2017 at 09:31 AM.

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    Senior Member turbo_harpoon's Avatar
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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Cocker's with experience with Marek's disease........... I have gotten it the first time in 30 plus years and want to ask you all who may know.
    1) Seems like my Lacy birds are dying at a higher rate than my others, Pure and 3/4 Lacy 1/4 Boston all dead-- ( the 3/4 Boston 1/4 Lacy are older and have not lost one.
    2) My Hargus greys (except 1 pullet) seem to be doing good so far.
    3) The origin of the disease is from 1 Mule Train pullet I bought 2 years ago. Not from Lonnie. But the MT seem fine so far.
    Are some more naturally resistant to the disease ? And is the Mule Train just a carrier and/or will her offspring be resistant ?
    I am aware that the whole yard may be a nuclear disaster, and have to kill everything. But now it just seems to be the Lacy blood dying like sheep with the Rot. Have had the Lacy blood for several years without a single problem. All started this year.
    Thanks in advance...Turbo

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Quote Originally Posted by turbo_harpoon View Post
    Cocker's with experience with Marek's disease........... I have gotten it the first time in 30 plus years and want to ask you all who may know.
    1) Seems like my Lacy birds are dying at a higher rate than my others, Pure and 3/4 Lacy 1/4 Boston all dead-- ( the 3/4 Boston 1/4 Lacy are older and have not lost one.
    2) My Hargus greys (except 1 pullet) seem to be doing good so far.
    3) The origin of the disease is from 1 Mule Train pullet I bought 2 years ago. Not from Lonnie. But the MT seem fine so far.
    Are some more naturally resistant to the disease ? And is the Mule Train just a carrier and/or will her offspring be resistant ?
    I am aware that the whole yard may be a nuclear disaster, and have to kill everything. But now it just seems to be the Lacy blood dying like sheep with the Rot. Have had the Lacy blood for several years without a single problem. All started this year.
    Thanks in advance...Turbo
    The mule train could have been treated and that's y they didn't get hit like the others. From what I read on Mareks is that your regular birds can bring it in. My suggestion is to kill everything that has it immediately and bleach their pens then cast lime to kill the disease. It spreads like wild fire but u can control it if u get after it.

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Marek's disease is a highly contagious viral neoplastic disease in chickens. It is named after József Marek, a Hungarian veterinarian. Marek's disease is caused by an alphaherpesvirus known as 'Marek's disease virus' (MDV) or Gallid alphaherpesvirus 2 (GaHV-2).[1] The disease is characterized by the presence of T cell lymphoma as well as infiltration of nerves and organs by lymphocytes.[2] Viruses related to MDV appear to be benign and can be used as vaccine strains to prevent Marek's disease. For example, the related Herpesvirus of Turkeys (HVT), causes no apparent disease in turkeys and continues to be used as a vaccine strain for prevention of Marek's disease (see below). Birds infected with GaHV-2 can be carriers and shedders of the virus for life. Newborn chicks are protected by maternal antibodies for a few weeks. After infection, microscopic lesions are present after one to two weeks, and gross lesions are present after three to four weeks. The virus is spread in dander from feather follicles and transmitted by inhalation.[3]

    Six syndromes are known to occur after infection with Marek's disease. These syndromes may overlap.

    • Classical Marek's disease or neurolymphomatosis causes asymmetric paralysis of one or more limbs. With vagus nerve involvement, difficulty breathing or dilation of the crop may occur. Besides lesions in the peripheral nerves, there are frequently lymphomatous infiltration/tumours in the skin, skeletal muscle, visceral organs. Organs that are commonly affected include the ovary, spleen, liver, kidneys, lungs, heart, proventriculus and adrenals.
    • Acute Marek's disease is an epidemic in a previously uninfected or unvaccinated flock, causing depression, paralysis, and death in a large number of birds (up to 80%). The age of onset is much earlier than the classic form; birds are four to eight weeks old when affected. Infiltration into multiple organs/tissue is observed.
    • Ocular lymphomatosis causes lymphocyte infiltration of the iris (making the iris turn grey), unequal size of the pupils, and blindness.
    • Cutaneous Marek's disease causes round, firm lesions at the feather follicles.[3]
    • Atherosclerosis is induced in experimentally infected chickens.[4]
    • Immunosuppression – Impairment of the T-lymphocytes prevents competent immunological response against pathogenic challenge and the affected birds become more susceptible to disease conditions such as coccidiosis and Escherichia coli infection .[5] Furthermore, without stimulation by cell-mediated immunity, the humoral immunity conferred by the B-cell lines from the Bursa of Fabricius also shuts down, thus resulting in birds that are totally immunocompromised.


    Diagnosis of lymphoid tumors in poultry is complicated due to multiple etiological agents capable of causing very similar tumors. It is not uncommon that more than one avian tumor virus can be present in a chicken, thus one must consider both the diagnosis of the disease/tumors (pathological diagnosis) and of the virus (etiological diagnosis). A step-wise process has been proposed for diagnosis of Marek’s disease which includes (1) history, epidemiology, clinical observations and gross necropsy, (2) characteristics of the tumor cell, and (3) virological characteristics[6]
    The demonstration of peripheral nerve enlargement along with suggestive clinical signs in a bird that is around three to four months old (with or without visceral tumors) is highly suggestive of Marek's disease. Histological examination of nerves reveals infiltration of pleomorphic neoplastic and inflammatory lymphocytes. Peripheral neuropathy should also be considered as a principal rule-out in young chickens with paralysis and nerve enlargement without visceral tumors, especially in nerves with interneuritic edema and infiltration of plasma cells.[7]
    The presence of nodules on the internal organs may also suggest Marek's disease, but further testing is required for confirmation. This is done through histological demonstration of lymphomatous infiltration into the affected tissue. A range of leukocytes can be involved, including lymphocytic cell lines such as large lymphocyte, lymphoblast, primitive reticular cells, and occasional plasma cells, as well as macrophage and plasma cells. The T cells are involved in the malignancy, showing neoplastic changes with evidence of mitosis. The lymphomatous infiltrates need to be differentiated from other conditions that affect poultry including lymphoid leukosis and reticuloendotheliosis, as well as an inflammatory event associated with hyperplastic changes of the affected tissue.
    Key clinical signs as well as gross and microscopic features that are most useful for differentiating Marek’s disease from lymphoid leukosis and reticuloendotheliosis include (1) Age: MD can affect birds at any age, including <16 weeks of age; (2) Clinical signs: Frequent wing and leg paralysis; (3) Incidence: >5% in unvaccinated flocks; (4) Potential nerve enlargement; (5) Interfollicular tumors in the bursa of Fabricius; (6) CNS involvement; (7) Lymphoid proliferation in skin and feather follicles; (8) Pleomorphic lymphoid cells in nerves and tumors; and (9) T-cell lymphomas.[8]
    In addition to gross pathology and histology, other advanced procedures used for a definitive diagnosis of Marek’s disease include immunohistochemistry to identify cell type and virus-specific antigens, standard and quantitative PCR for identification of the virus, virus isolation to confirm infections, and serology to confirm/exclude infections.


    Vaccination is the only known method to prevent the development of tumors when chickens are infected with the virus. However, administration of vaccines does not prevent transmission of the virus, i.e., the vaccine is not sterilizing.[2] However, it does reduce the amount of virus shed in the dander, hence reduces horizontal spread of the disease. Marek's disease does not spread vertically. The vaccine was introduced in 1970, and the scientists credited with its development are Ben Roy Burmester and Frank J Siccardi.[10] Before that, Marek's disease caused substantial revenue loss in the poultry industries of the United States and the United Kingdom. The vaccine can be administered to one-day-old chicks through subcutaneous inoculation or by in ovo vaccination when the eggs are transferred from the incubator to the hatcher. In ovo vaccination is the preferred method, as it does not require handling of the chicks and can be done rapidly by automated methods. Immunity develops within two weeks.[3]
    The vaccine originally contained the antigenically similar turkey herpesvirus, which is serotype 3 of MDV.[11] However, because vaccination does not prevent infection with the virus,[12] the Marek's disease virus has evolved increased virulence and resistance to this vaccine. As a result, current vaccines use a combination of vaccines consisting of HVT and gallid herpesvirus type 3 or an attenuated MDV strain, CVI988-Rispens

    MORE READING HERE......

    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/3783/mareks-disease-control-in-broiler-breeds/


    Last edited by Crazy Eyes; October 11th, 2018 at 10:36 PM.

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    Senior Member aguazarca's Avatar
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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Quote Originally Posted by Disciple View Post
    Friend, I wouldn't buy chicks that were vaccinated for Mareks as they don't have a strong immune system and you'll always have to vaccinate for it. Best to get chicks from a good small time breeder with solid birds that doesn't have to vaccinate as he culls all sick ones. The axe is the best vaccine
    That's what I used to say until I lost a $1k broodcock to the disease.

    Now I vacc everything.

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Quote Originally Posted by turbo_harpoon View Post
    Cocker's with experience with Marek's disease........... I have gotten it the first time in 30 plus years and want to ask you all who may know.
    1) Seems like my Lacy birds are dying at a higher rate than my others, Pure and 3/4 Lacy 1/4 Boston all dead-- ( the 3/4 Boston 1/4 Lacy are older and have not lost one.
    2) My Hargus greys (except 1 pullet) seem to be doing good so far.
    3) The origin of the disease is from 1 Mule Train pullet I bought 2 years ago. Not from Lonnie. But the MT seem fine so far.
    Are some more naturally resistant to the disease ? And is the Mule Train just a carrier and/or will her offspring be resistant ?
    I am aware that the whole yard may be a nuclear disaster, and have to kill everything. But now it just seems to be the Lacy blood dying like sheep with the Rot. Have had the Lacy blood for several years without a single problem. All started this year.
    Thanks in advance...Turbo

    Yes, some are more resistant. I lost a bunch of Leipers and YLHs, but just a few Kelsos.

    I culled everything that had a *hint* of the disease, and vaccinated the rest (they say it doesn't help after the first day after hatched but neither does it hurt them).

    Then I moved everything to a safe area while I changed the sand in every pen, and used lime + a local virucide (PiSA's TH4).

    So far so good, over a year after it hit me.

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Sorry to hear that,aguazarca what ever works for you stay with it. I prefer not to vaccinate and so far 35 years with chickens I’ve not had any of the major diseases. Hopefully I’ll go another 35 lol. Good luck with the health of your yard"
    Last edited by Disciple; October 12th, 2018 at 05:04 AM.

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Quote Originally Posted by Disciple View Post
    Sorry to hear that,aguazarca what ever works for you stay with it. I prefer not to vaccinate and so far 35 years with chickens I’ve not had any of the major diseases. Hopefully I’ll go another 35 lol. Good luck with the health of your yard"
    That was me Disciple, until this year. The guy who I got the Mule Train from has Mareks on his yard pretty bad. I did know that until it was too late. Found out another one of his buddies fights it also.

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Quote Originally Posted by aguazarca View Post
    Yes, some are more resistant. I lost a bunch of Leipers and YLHs, but just a few Kelsos.

    I culled everything that had a *hint* of the disease, and vaccinated the rest (they say it doesn't help after the first day after hatched but neither does it hurt them).

    Then I moved everything to a safe area while I changed the sand in every pen, and used lime + a local virucide (PiSA's TH4).


    So far so good, over a year after it hit me.
    That is what I am doing....Anything that stumbles loses it's head. I am still in a holding pattern seeing what is going to happen. I have been told that the stags get hit the worst at penning age. Had a couple much older than that this summer. 1/2 Lacy.

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    Senior Member southernX's Avatar
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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    As Ive said on past posts, I very seldom get mareks, Maybe one a year. Most times it will hit from 6-18 months old fowl. I pen all my hens and pullets together in the fall. If I do have one that comes down with it I leave it till it dies in the pen with the others. Never have had an outbreak of it been doing this for years and years and years.

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    It may be a pain to vaccinate as you need to do it quickly but I can tell you this, and MAYBE its my imagination, but it seems to always hit the strongest, best stags. Always seemed like cheap insurance to me. I can tell you this, and its no opinion. If you have it strike one, sooner or later its going to strike more. Just as you are watching and imagining just how good that perfect stag is going to be at bullstag age BAM one leg goes out.

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    Re: Marek’s Disease help

    Quote Originally Posted by peter g View Post
    It may be a pain to vaccinate as you need to do it quickly but I can tell you this, and MAYBE its my imagination, but it seems to always hit the strongest, best stags. Always seemed like cheap insurance to me. I can tell you this, and its no opinion. If you have it strike one, sooner or later its going to strike more. Just as you are watching and imagining just how good that perfect stag is going to be at bullstag age BAM one leg goes out.
    Yeah I had a couple stags last spring that were 14 months old get it. And a 2 year old hatch hen. They were the first. I have lost them late, and early so far, I will vaccinate this year for sure.

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