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Thread: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

  
  1. #1
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    Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    Has anybody heard anything about mr jerry lately?
    Been calling him for a couple weeks but he hasn't answered

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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    If your taking about JBL Farm this is what it was posted on his Social Media



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    He otta still have some good ones on his yard. If I were looking there, his Dom, WH, Asil and Albany might be really worth the time spent.
    Best wishes
    SF
    Last edited by KevinG; November 19th, 2019 at 04:22 PM.

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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    This article was published 2016 but was probably written prior to that date. It has some info on his breeds and moisture in the body.


    J. B. Lawrence, JBL Farm, Pleasanton, Texas: From Engineer to Game Fowl Breeder
    on 01 January 2016.

    By J.B. LAWRENCE

    Greetings to Gamefowl fanciers and sportsmen. My name is Jerold (Jerry) Lawrence, owner of JBL Farm, and I welcome the opportunity to provide this interview. I am 72 years old and have been with the Gamefowl my entire life- fighting, training, handling, and breeding. I did time to earn a BSEE degree from Stanford University and I have had a good career designing electrical high voltage facilities. AT this time, I do not participate in fighting and training and I only breed for legal uses, but I will share with you every aspect of the sport that may be of interest, based on my past experiences.

    jbl farm logo

    My father, Roy Lawrence and his nephew, Stan Wardell, grew up together in Utah, and then California, fighting in short gaffs and later in long gaffs, and I was always with them from the time I was a small boy. In the 1950’s my father and I would compete at illegal fights in California in long heel derbies and in LK matches at the vegetable farms that were populated at that time by workers from the Philippines. After I moved to Texas in 1970 I learned to also compete in Mexican SK, competing at the Palenques in Mexico.

    My farm is now located in South Texas near the city of Pleasanton, where I have been established since 1999. I do not count the number of birds on the farm, but I use aboutr 300 lbs. of feed each day.

    My breeding is dedicated to pure or straight-bred fowl to be used for breeding, and any cross breeds are disposed of at an early age. There are many fine bloodlines on my farm but some of my favorites are the Doms which have some bloodline from my father, the Wardell Whitehackles from my cousin Stan Wardell, the Boles and Little Spud Asils, and the Penny Hatch which I acquired from Terry Penny of Soddy Daisy, TN. Many of my bloodlines are shown on my website www.jblfarm.com.

    The Doms have been bred by me since 1993 when I acquired a trio from a long-time friend in San Antonio, TX to breed with the last Dom cock that was in my father’s possession. One of my father’s Dom cocks was shown in 1993 at the Copperstate pit in gaff and was so impressive that we had a trail of people following us back to the cockhouse to purchase the cock. These Doms that my father had were developed by a Native Indian cocker on the local reservation in AZ, “Indian David,” who sewed wounded birds at the Copperstate pit. These Doms from Indian David were bred from the Mingus bloodline, which according to what I have read were Cuban Dom crossed with Sid Taylor, and maybe Blue Traveler. The Doms that I acquired in San Antonio, TX, originally came from a man named Ferguson from Lebanon, TN. These Doms were large powerful birds and I was told they had some Pinnon YL Hatch bred into them. One of the first Dom cocks that I raised was shown in LK in Yuma and Quartzite AZ on 3 occasions and was known among some of the Filipino cockers from CA for his quick kills. About 2004, as I remember, I traded Doms with Chris Chappell of Alabama, and after proving these to be excellent fowl continued some of the Chappell Dom in my bloodline. Also, about this same time, a cross of my Dom on Walton straight-comb Hatch produced some phenomenal cocks that were multiple winners in Louisiana competition, so I continued an infusion of the Walton bloodline. At the present time, I prefer to call the Doms “JBL American Dom,” as they have English and Cuban Dom in their bloodline as well as traditional American bloodlines. The JBL Doms are typical of most Dom fowl producing many variations of color, including some black pullets wg=hich are a throw-back to the Sid Taylor that Mr. Mingus used. The more “pure” that I breed the Doms the more they come predominantly white—the ones you see that are heavily colored, red or dark, are the result of out-cross to red colored or black colored fowl. For a reason that I cannot explain, almost all Dom colored Gamefowl, no matter who is the breeder, seem to be accurate cutters and have good instincts for timing and gaining advantage on their opponent. I strongly recommend Dom fowl from reputable breeders for competition in the Philippines, but remember JBL Farm does not sell birds for the purpose of fighting. Dom fowl will cross well with Roundhead, Sweater, YL and GL Hatch, and black fowl.

    The Wardell Whitehakles have been bred by me beginning in 1966 when Stan gave me a trio of WH and a trio of his Perry Hatch. When I moved to Texas in 1970, I returned what I had to Stan. I later acquired the WH, Hatch and Asil beginning in 1992 when Stan was living in Oregon. The WH bloodline began in the 1940’s when Stan’s father acquired fowl from Dad Gleezen. About 1970, or earlier, Stan acquired Gilkerson WH from a Mr. Giles in New York State—these were mostly spangle fowl and were great pit fowl. Stan defeated the legendary Bobby Boles in several matches in these spangle WH. Most of this spangle bloodline was lost when Stan sent the main brood yards to Arkansas and they were destroyed in a brush fire. About 1990, Stan found some of the same bloodline from Mr. Giles with an old-timer in Iowa and began again breeding the Gilkersons. Along the way, he developed a line of Pumpkin colored WH that he called “Goldies.” The Goldies had a little (very little) pumpkin Hulsey and Perry Hatch. Over his long career with these fine animals Stan gifted the WH to Hugh Norman and others, including a man in England. The Wardell WH that I breed have the Gleezen, The Gilkerson, and the Goldie bloodlines in them, and are excellent fowl either straight or crossed. These WH have power, smart style and killing ability. I do not raise very many and only sell them with special consideration of the buyer. There are several other breeders who also have these wonderful WH from Stan and have them available. For LK competition, the WH crossed with Lacy Roundhead, and WH crossed with Claret have both been proven winners for decades.

    My first Asil fowl was given to me by Stan Wardell in 1996; these were spangled red in color, and were the Tom Lyons’ Atkinson Asil. In the 1940’s when Stan and Tom were working together at the Treasure Island shipyard in CA, they, together, acquired Atkinson Asil from a Canadian man whose last name was Matthews. The little cock they received was built like a large potato and they named him “Little Spud,” and that name has endured to the present day. These Little Spud Asils are small, quick, and extremely intelligent fighters. After realizing how good these little cocks are, I acquired more of Little Spud bloodline from two other breeders who also had bloodline tracing back to Tom Lyons.

    I have always admired the Asils that were bred by Bobby Boles, seeing them perform, and even matching into them for years. There is little doubt that Mr. Boles was one of the greatest cockers in modern time. But it was impossible to obtain these Asils, as Bobby and his brother Clarence absolutely did not let any out. The Boles brothers had also used a Jap cock at one time, and they referred to their fowl as “Oriental” not using the name Asil or Jap, so perhaps they infused some of the Jap bloodline into their Asil. Over the years some of the Asil bloodline did leave their yard. For example, another famous Asil breeder obtained one-half of the Bole line by way of breeding agreement that was made with Bobby; also, several birds were stolen from Bobby and Clarence; and the, at the end of Bobby’s career, a few birds were given to the locals in Madera, CA, who helped care for the fowl during periods of illness. And there is a man in Colorado that was given some of the Asil bloodline and the Polecat Black bloodline, but this man has never let out a feather, in accordance with Bobby’s request. Leonard Mitra, in the Philippines, did also receive some of Bobby’s stock. Bobby tried other types of Asil over the years including the Tom Lyons Atkinson and the Bombay Asil and these stocks would be given away, but not the old line Asil. There are many stories of people obtaining Asil bloodline from the Boles brothers, but it is most likely the fowls were grades and not pure, because they refused offers of huge amounts of money to purchase the pure old line bloodline from them. In recent years I have had the opportunity to acquire some of the Boles Asils that have surfaced from the stolen blood and some of the Madera Bloodline. The Boles Asils are smart, strong and deadly, but are not as quick as Little Spuds.

    The Boles Asil and the Little Spud have been bred for years to be body hitters and have been tested and selected for gameness in steel weapons. If you choose to try some of the high-station naked heel type of Asil, you must realize that these are head hitters and are game in natural heel with damage and punishment to the head and not the body. I am sure that there are some good ones of this type, but using them will be very experimental. Asils cross well with many American bloodlines; Bobby Boles preferred crossing to black fowl that were good-cutting body hitters, and in recent times many American cockers have been successful crossing to Kelso and GL Hatch. One-half Asil has been the best cross, but for use in the Philippines, maybe one-quarter Asil will be better, depending on the Asil bloodline that is used. Most breeders use the Asil on the cock side and the American on the hen side. But if you are going to grade to one-quarter Asil, I believ it is best to keep the Asil on the hen side all the way to one-quarter or even one-eighth.

    I became aware of the Penny Hatch when I heard the stories of the Penny fowl winning at Copperstate and how game and tough they were. Indian David sewed some of the Penny Hatch cocks that were fought in Mexican 1-inch and he told me the breast meat was very dark in color and similr to a dove, whereas most birds he had sewed had pinkish/reddish color breast meat. I eventually obtained some of the Penny fowl, about 1994, and became well acquainted with Terry Penny. The Penny Hatch were not a set family but were blended from the old Ruble Hatch, Harold Brown Hatch, Johnny Moore Democrat Hatch, JD Perry Hatch, Claret and probably some other bloodlines. I think that what has made the Penny Hatch great is the selection and demanding quest for gameness that Sherill Penny used in his breeding. Terry Penny took over the fowl in about 1980 went Sherill went to prison. Terry is now in prison due to a very unfortunate incident, so there is no longer any breeding of the Penny Hatch line by the Penny family. These Penny hatch are the gamest, hardest hitting, toughest cocks that I have ever seen. Much of the “Penny” Hatch being bred at this time are the hatch cocks that were bred by the late Tom dale of Oklahoma. Mr. Dale apparently used some of the Penny bloodline and infused with other bloodlines to make this version of the Penny hatch. The Tom Dale Penny are excellent fowl and are faster and more athletic than the fowl that Sherill and Terry produced, but not as powerful.

    My philosophy for producing battlefowl for top competition is to always use crossbred fowl, never purebred. Use 2-way, 3-way and even 4-way crosses. Combine speed and power, pea comb short body and straight comb long body and find what works for you. Unless you are producing for selling, do not worry about big tails, white streamers or certain colors—these characteristics never won a cockfight and are not necessarily a sign of good breeding. The results of good breeding are courage, intelligence, power and accuracy—none of which can be determined by the appearance of the cock. Select station, style and balance that you like, they are YOUR birds, but always believe in the win percentage and do not make excuses for losses just because you think they are beautiful birds or have a big-name bloodline. Some examples of great 2-way LK battle crosses are Whitehackle x Roundhead, Law Grey x Roundhead, Kelso x YL Hatch. An example of great 3-way cross is radio x Roundhead over Kelso. A 4-way example is Lacy RH x Bruner RH over Kelso x GL Hatch.

    When breeding the pure families, try to get more that one line of the stock. For example if you want to breed Sweaters, get fowl from 3 independent breeders and as you prove each one you can begin to select the best individuals and continue breeding for years without resorting to incestuous practices. If you do not have the resources to do this, you can work with some of your friends in a team effort. Occasionally, it is a good idea to try a mating of son to mother, or brother and sister; but when you do this, consider it experimental and carefully evaluate the offspring before using them. If you have an old family bloodline that has been bred pure for many years, you can try to find a good infusion of outside blood. Just an example, if you have an old line of Claret fowl and need to rejuvenate the bloodline try an outcross to a quality Albany cock and then select and breed away from the Albany. Do not wait until the old Claret family has already deteriorated to start looking for an infusion. By the way, Claret and Albany were used by E.W. law to produce the great Clipper fowl.

    In today’s competition, there are many fine cocks shown and the win is often determined by the best conditioned cock. In days past, I loved to condition birds for fighting and I have always believed that the cock’s body moisture is critical to winning. I would like to share the following thoughts with you:

    The water in the cock’s body is balanced between the inside of the cells and outside of the cells. THIS BALANCE IS ABSOLUTELY CRITICAL in your conditioned bird. The water balance at the cell wall is largely controlled by the body electrolytes. Sodium extracts water from cell and potassium pulls water into the cell. The amount of potassium consumed should be twice the amount of sodium. Many electrolyte products sold for animals have too much sodium and the label should always be checked. Other factors affecting water balance: Anabolic steroid and testosterone hold water in the cell. Stress will pull water out of the cells. Water not in the cells is located in the blood, in the digestive system, and is lubricant to the skin and joints. If this water is severely drawn into cells many people call this “too dry” but is actually the water being out of balance. A skilled conditioner can feel the water balance by the tone of the flesh, the skin and joint flexibility. For LK, the flesh at fight time should be springy like a sponge, NOT hard, loose or dead. The skin and joints should be flexible not too tight or too loose. If the skin is too loose the bird will hit low, and if the skin is too tight the bird will not reach. A bird that is pulling water to the cell or holding cellular water will have firm dropping and a bird that has water coming out of the cells will have a wet dropping. If the wet dropping continues, the out-of-balance bird will then become dehydrated. Some feeders tend to keep a cock’s dropping loose and correct during the point by tightening, and some keep a cock’s droppings tight and correct during the point by loosening. I think you have more control if you keep a bird tight and strong and then correct during the point. But remember it takes 2 or 3 days to correct. Egg white, cottage cheese, buttermilk, bread, and canned meat are all high in sodium (salt). These foods will pull water out of the cells and into blood, skin, digestion and loosen a cock. The sodium will also make the bird thirsty so you need to plan if you are going to allow water consumption and how much. Corn and other carbohydrates (NOT wheat), potassium rich foods such as banana and anabolic steroid will tighten a bird, and he will not be thirsty and can be offered free choice of water. How do you know if the total amount of water in the birds body is correct?—Weigh the birds being conditioned everyday when they are empty and any change of weight over a 1 or 2 day period is usually due to water fluctuation; over the last 2 days the birds weight should drop about 2 ounces by fight day.

    It has been my pleasure to provide breeding materials to the Philippines and I enjoy doing business with Filipino cockers, who are usually very cordial gentlemen and pleasant to do business with. My bloodlines are residing in the Philippines in the hands of people like Rene Umali, Jayson and Joel Garces of Cebu, Honor Roan, Vency Maranan from Laguna, Celso Evangelista of Longscore Gamefarm, Paul Bulls in Mindanao, James Sagario, Carlo Bueser, Alex Aguila from Batangas. Enrico Gamboa of Caloocan City, Dr. Mac Abad, Dr. Arnold Moral from Laguna, and Dandy Ozaeta. There are many others that I will not name as they prefer to remain anonymous.

  7. #5
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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    Thanks guys. I got a hold of jbl already.
    I was interested in his albany blood. Does anybody have any experience with them?

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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    Quote Originally Posted by avalos1991 View Post
    Thanks guys. I got a hold of jbl already.
    I was interested in his albany blood. Does anybody have any experience with them?
    I personally dont but Im sure someone here does have personal knowledge of his Albany Avalos.
    SF

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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    Does anyone have experience with his sids. I spoke to him once and he told me he had a cpl familys of sids.

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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyroller View Post
    Does anyone have experience with his sids. I spoke to him once and he told me he had a cpl familys of sids.
    Last time I went by his place, I saw the Sids. They are big bodied, big sobs.
    SF

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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    I spoke to jerry today he has a few sids left but he ain't trying to sell me any lol good luck fellas

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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    Jerry is doing well. He is still selling everything except a a few select brood pairs. He has a couple of Sids and they will be available as a first come first serve. His phone numbers are still valid for those who would like to inquire about his fowl.

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  17. #11
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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    Anyone have his penny's? How are they on talent? Liveability? Bottom?

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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    Seems most of the cockers are retiring reaching the ages of 70, 80, and 90. Jim Farley who was the breeder here in Ontario,Canada, sold all his gamefowls including hens last year and made a killing selling his farm to a developer. But kept a broodcock and two hens. Too bad, all went in Montreal, Quebec.

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    Re: Any news on Jerry Lawrence

    Sad to hear we have Good Cockers/Breeders are getting to their age and retiring from the sport!

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